Approved by Faculty Senate

University Studies Course Proposal Form

Students are presented with practical everyday problems and are expected to analyze the specific situations, study and assess alternative solutions and select the most workable ones.

Students will communicate their ideas both orally and in writing to their professor, peers, site supervisors, and clientele, when appropriate.

Students will apply gained theoretical knowledge to practical situations to identify the problems and the possible alternative solutions and will select the most practicable ones.

Students will be assigned to work sites and given responsibility for dealing with previously identified problems. They will demonstrate their problem solving ability by discussing their proposed solutions with the professor, their peers, and their work site supervisors.

Students will volunteer their time and energy to various community agencies. They will discuss their particular situations with their peers and professor in classroom settings.

 

 

1. Department or Program Political Science and Public Administration

2. Course Number 218

3. Semester Hours 3

4. Frequency of Offering Every Semester

5. Course Title Community Service

6. Catalog Description

Democratic theory calls for participation of citizens not only in decision-making but also in community affairs. Students will be offered the opportunity to be involved in their community by volunteering their services, and time, to not-for-profit organizations as a community service. Such participation would foster community asset building and be beneficial to both the student volunteer and the community at large.

7. This is an existing course previously approved by A2C2 No

8. This is a new course proposal Yes

9. University Studies Requirement this course would satisfy Contemporary Citizenship

10. Department Contact Person for this course Yogesh Grover – 457-5415 ygrover@winona.edu

11. General Course Outcomes

This course involves the students in their community affairs as volunteers in different community activities. Students will get a realistic appreciation of the needs of their community and will seek workable solutions to its problems.

12. Course Outcomes

bulletUse critical thinking to analyze contemporary issues:
bulletDemonstrate effective oral and/or written communication of ideas, informed opinions, and/or values
bulletIdentify, find and use tools of information science related to contemporary issues
bulletDemonstrate the ability to work effectively independently and/or in collaborative problem solving groups
bulletParticipate actively (e.g., class discussion, volunteerism, etc.) in issues significant to citizens in contemporary society

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

New Course Proposal

Community Service, POLS 218

 A.  COURSE DESCRIPTION

    1. Catalog Description
    2. Democratic theory calls for participation of citizens not only in decision-making but also in community affairs. Students will be offered the opportunity to be involved in their community by volunteering their services, and time, to not-for-profit organizations as a community service. Such participation would foster community asset building and be beneficial to both the student volunteer and the community at large.

    3. Major Focus and Objectives of the Course
    4. The major focus of the course is on helping build a democratic society based on involvement of its citizens in the running of its affairs. Only when citizens are involved in the affairs of their community will they get a realistic appreciation of the needs of their community and will they seek workable solutions to its problems. Volunteerism is a desirable quality of democratic societies. In the absence of volunteerism, autocratic, strong and centralized governments are likely to evolve. Students will be encouraged to volunteer their talents and services to their community and to be active participants in problem solving. Organized volunteerism under the direction of mentors is likely to yield greater benefits to the community than ad hoc activities. Students will be under the mentorship of one or more faculty members who will help them deal with issues that arise at the "workplace".

    5. Course Outline of Major Topics and Subtopics
    1. Democratic Theory (Outcomes A, G)
    2. Role of Citizen in Community Affairs (Outcomes A, B, C)
    3. Volunteerism vs. Professionalism (Outcomes G)
    4. The citizen-participant (Outcomes B, D, G)
      1. Voting and elections
      2. Problem-solving
        1. Problem identification
        2. Solution identification
        3. Identification of venues for problem solving
        4. Communication of solution
          1. to those affected
          2. to the general public
        5. Implementation of solution
    1. Basic Instructional Plan and Methods Utilized
    2. Students will meet in class as a group, or with the instructor individually, or via an Internet conference, or videoconference, or by other means, at least once a week for the purpose of sharing experience and exploring options for problem solving.

      Students will be assigned to a "work station" in one or more not-for-profit organizations to spend an average of eight hours/week of volunteer time. Students may identify their own "work stations" or they may be assigned to organizations that indicated a need for such volunteers. Students may also design their own community service projects and explore ways of implementing them, under the direction of one or more faculty members.

    3. University Studies Outcome Objectives for Contemporary Citizenship:
    1. Use critical thinking to analyze contemporary issues,
    2. Demonstrate effective oral and/or written communication of ideas, informed opinion, and/or values,
    3. Identify, find, and use tools of information science related to contemporary issues,
    4. Demonstrate the ability to work effectively, independently, and/or in collaborative problem-solving groups,
    5. Identify principles and applications of personal, civic, and/or economic responsibility,
    6. Understand personal responsibility for lifestyle choices, and/or
    7. Participate actively (e.g., class discussion, volunteerism, etc.) in issues significant to citizenship in contemporary society.

When students have completed this course, they are expected, as a minimum, to have attained the following outcomes: Use critical thinking to analyze contemporary issues,

        1. Use critical thinking to analyze contemporary issues,
        2. Demonstrate effective oral and/or written communication of ideas, informed opinion, and/or values,
        3. Identify, find, and use tools of information science related to contemporary issues,
        4. Demonstrate the ability to work effectively, independently, and/or in collaborative problem-solving groups,
        5. Participate actively (e.g., class discussion, volunteerism, etc.) in issues significant to citizenship in contemporary society.
    1. Course Requirements and Means of Evaluation
        1. Weekly meetings with the instructor
        2. Spending an average of 8 hours per week per credit hour volunteering their services to not-for-profit organizations (governmental or non-governmental)
        3. Keeping a log of activities (diary)
        4. Providing periodic assessment reports, both orally and in writing, about the students’ experiences to the instructor and to other class members
        5. Writing a final assessment report of the experience
        6. Obtaining periodic evaluation of the performance of the students on the job, as well as a final written evaluation from a direct supervisor
    2. Textbooks or Alternatives
      1. Robert Putnam, Bowling Alone
      2. Robert Bellah, Habits of the Heart
    3. References and Bibliography

A library of references stemming from the quality movement is being built around the concept of community asset building and participation in the 21st century. Most of the available material is electronically retrievable and the bibliography is growing daily.

B.  Rationale

    The political science and public administration department has focused its curriculum on theoretical bases. However, the practice of politics and involvement in community affairs are at the core of political science and public administration theories. Junior and senior students have the opportunity to be involved in community affairs and in problem solving though the internship program. The internship program is limited almost exclusively to majors and minors in the field. However, first and second year students who wish to offer their services to the community could be stifled in their efforts. This course will offer the opportunity to first and second year students, and others, to offer their skills, expertise, and time to their communities. It is not designed to be restricted to majors or minors in political science or public administration, but to all students regardless of major. No courses would be deleted from the curriculum if this course is approved.

C.  NOTIFICATION

    The course does not affect the number of credits required in any of the majors or minors offered by any of the departments in the university. Thus, notification is not necessary.

D. 'G’ COURSES

    Does not apply.

E.  UNIVERSITY STUDIES COURSE PROPOSAL JUSTIFICATION

The University Studies’ requirements call for a category of contemporary citizenship. This course would fall in this category. Additionally, this course would provide for meaningful participation of students in their community affairs and would contribute to community asset building. A community in which citizens take active roles in its affairs is a safe community to live in. Community participation should not, and is not, limited to those who make the study of politics their professional career. This course would be open to all students.

This course would promote students’ abilities to

    1. Use critical thinking to analyze contemporary issues,
    2. Demonstrate effective oral and/or written communication of ideas, informed opinion, and/or values,
    3. Identify, find, and use tools of information science related to contemporary issues,
    4. Demonstrate the ability to work effectively, independently, and/or in collaborative problem-solving groups,
    5. Identify principles and applications of personal, civic, and/or economic responsibility,
    6. Understand personal responsibility for lifestyle choices, and/or
    7. Participate actively (e.g., class discussion, volunteerism, etc.) in issues significant to citizenship in contemporary society.