Approved by Faculty Senate

Political Science Department

P.S. 390 Comparative Politics in the Third World

Year and Semester Professor Office Location Office Hours Telephone E-Mail
FALL, 2001 Dr. Ahmed El-Afandi 119 Minne Hall 12:00 - 1:00 MTW
1:00 - 2:30 MW or by appointment
457-5403 wnelafand@winona.edu

 

SYLLABUS

 

Course Focus Course Requirements The Research Paper Attendance Policy
Textbooks Weekly Assignments WRITING YOUR PAPER ACADEMIC INTEGRITY
Results Out of Class Assignment    

Major Focus and Objectives

This course is designed to provide the student with a base for comparison of political systems and processes in the Third World. It is part of the series in the comparative politics component in the Department and meets the comparative requirement for the major. This course meets the Multicultural Perspective of the University Studies Program.  In the context of this course, the Third World is defined to be those political systems that did not follow the capitalist or the communist models of development. It consists largely of countries that had the common experience of having gained independence during the twentieth century from the European colonial powers.

The course will explore the commonalties and the differences between these political systems and the models of development they have adopted. An assessment of the relative degrees of success in the implementation of these models will be made.
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University Studies Outcomes:

a. Demonstrate knowledge of diverse patterns and similarities of thought, values, and beliefs as manifest in different cultures;
b. Understand the extent to which cultural differences influence the interpretation and expression of events, ideas and experiences;
c. Understand the extent to which cultural differences influence the interactions between individuals and/or groups;
d. Examine different cultures through their various expressions;
e. Possess the skills necessary for interaction with someone from a different culture or cultural group.

Students who complete this course are expected to have attained the following outcomes:

a. Demonstrate knowledge of diverse patterns and similarities of thought, values, and beliefs as manifest in different cultures;
b. Understand the extent to which cultural differences influence the interpretation and expression of events, ideas and experiences;
c. Possess the skills necessary for interaction with someone from a different culture or cultural group.

Course Requirements

Two exams: a mid-term and a final (essay and short essay combinations)

A research paper

Each of these requirements will be worth one-third of the grade.
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The Research Paper

Each of the students will do a research paper dealing with one of the topics identified by the instructor. A list of these topics will be made available to the students during the first full week of classes. Students will sign up for their research topics no later than the end of the second week of classes. Students may opt to change their topics, but no changes will be accepted past the end of the fourth week of classes.

The purposes of the research paper are:

    1. to help the student evaluate different theoretical constructs in terms of their utility and applicability to the "real world." The student will be advised to select a theoretical construct that would have the best potential for application to the topic chosen.
    2. To help the student sharpen the already existing research skills.
    3. To develop new research skills.

The finished product should reflect substantial improvement over what the student was capable of doing prior to enrolling in the class. It is expected that the paper will undergo a number of revisions. Thus, multiple drafts will be expected. Students are to retain all drafts (including the handwritten ones) and research notes. These will be kept in a portfolio which will be handed in at the same time as the final draft.

Research papers are due no later than April 29, 1999. Only papers with a pre-approved legitimate excuse will be accepted at a pre-designated later date (agreed to by both parties). Other late papers will lose the equivalent of a letter grade for every three calendar days they are late.
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Attendance Policy

While the University has no mandatory attendance policy, students will discover that they will be at a considerable disadvantage with excessive absenteeism. When the final grades are figured out, students with a good attendance record will be favored in marginal cases to receive the higher of the two grades between which they might fall. For every two un-excused days of absence, however, the student will lose one letter grade from the final course grade. An absence should be excused prior to the occurrence or immediately thereafter. If a week elapses after the student's return to class without requesting that the absence be excused, the absence shall be deemed un-excusable.
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Out of Class Activity

Students are expected to participate in a course chat room regarding questions that the instructor will raise during the course of the semester.  They should be able to respond to the professor's questions and to each other's comments.  The professor will monitor the discussion but will not be a direct participant.  Students may earn extra credit for the course through this pariticipation.
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Textbooks

Weatherby, Joseph N, et. al. The Other World: Issues and Politics of the Developing World. 3rd ed. New York: Longman. 1997.

Diamond, Larry, ed. Political Culture & Democracy in Developing Countries. Textbook ed. Boulder: CO: Lynne Rienner. 2000.

Human Development Report – 2001. New York: Oxford University Press (UNPD). 2001.

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Weekly Assignments (Expected Outcomes: A, B, C, D, E)

To be announced in class.

Mid-semester exam: to be announced in class.

Final exam: see class schedule.

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