Course Approved By Faculty Senate.

University Studies Course Approval Submission

Residential College Course Proposal

  1. Department of Program: Residential College
  2. Course Number: 235
  3. Semester Hours: 3
  4. Frequency of Offering: Every other semester

5. Course Title: INTERDISCIPLINARY APPROACH TOWOMEN AND SOCIAL JUSTICE ISSUES IN LATIN AMERICA

6. Catalog Description: This course demonstrates how ordinary women have had transformational roles in the social and political spheres of their countries. It will explore how women have chosen to participate in collective action in Chile, Guatemala, El Salvador and Mexico to address human rights issues and how family values can become a part of public life. (Grade only. Recommended prerequisite: SOC 150)

  1. This is not an existing course previously approved by A2C2
  2. This is a new course proposal.
  3. University Studies Requirement this course would satisfy: Unity and Diversity/ Global Perspectives
  4. Department Contact Person: Linda D’Amico, 453-2517: ldamico@vax2.msus.edu
  5. General Course and Proposal Information:

Women and Social Justice Issues in Latin America, RC 235, is being proposed as a Global Perspectives Course. RC 235 has the intent to provide students with skills to recognize the power of individuals within society. They will become aware of the issues surrounding human rights, including health, civil, education, environmental and cultural rights. Approximately 30 students will participate in class discussions, readings and presentations. Texts may change according to most recent research, but underlying structures of how the socially and economically marginalized can be empowered will be investigated and articulated.

Specific Outcomes for USP Global Perspectives:

A. Understand the role of the world citizen and the responsibility world citizens share for their common global future: This course demonstrates how ordinary women have had transformational roles in the social and political spheres of their countries. It will explore how women have chosen to participate in collective action in Chile, Guatemala, El Salvador and Mexico to address human rights issues and how family values can become a part of public life.

B. Describe and analyze social, economic, political, spiritual, or environmental elements that influence the relations between living beings and their environments or between societies. The main objective is to examine how women’s voices and actions have been and continue to be important with regard to social justice issues in Latin America. What are the political and economic situations which spur particular women to become activists? How have women become actors on the local, national and international stages for human rights?

    1. Identify and analyze specific global issues, illustrating the social,
    2. economic, political, spiritual or environmental differences that may affect their resolution. This course will challenge students to consider how global political economies are interconnected, and moreover how the role of Latin American women in the second half of the 20th century has contributed to the discourse of human rights in their respective countries. First, students will be introduced to so called ’traditional’ gender roles, and then explore through specific ethnographic examples how women have been the catalysts for change. They will also be asked to documents the oral history of a recent Latina immigrant in southeastern Minnesota.

      Sample Syllabus

      WOMEN AND SOCIAL JUSTICE ISSUES IN LATIN AMERICA

      University Studies

      Residential College 235

      Dr. Linda D’Amico

      453-2517

      e-mail: ldamico@winona.edu

      This course will challenge students to consider how global political economies are interconnected, and moreover how the role of Latin American women in the second half of the 20th century has contributed to the discourse of human rights in their respective countries. First, students will be introduced to so called ’traditional’ gender roles, and then explore through specific ethnographic examples how women have been and continue to be the catalysts for change.

      Specifically, the course fits into the mission and goal of the Residential College in addition to Women’s Studies. It will provide an interdisciplinary view of human rights issues from women’s perspective in several Latin American countries while developing students’ critical thinking, writing, and problem solving skills. Students will explore the question in cross-cultural scenarios: How are values expressed in the home translated into the arena of social justice? Furthermore, the course will pique students’ intellectual curiosity and establish life-long learning capacities to understand our complex and globalized world and to stand up to human rights discrepancies.

      Course Requirements

      Social, political and economic injustices in Latin American will be explored through specific historic examples. Students will gain an understanding of the role of Latin American women in these processes through readings, discussions and films. There will also be an outreach component to this course, where students will interview Latin American women in out community to gain an understanding of some of the obstacles they have faced. Short essays (30%), discussions (10%), presentations(10%), a midterm (25%)and final exam (25%) will be the methods of evaluation.

      Textbooks

      Guzman Bouvard, Marguerite. Revolutionizing Motherhood: The Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo. Scholarly Resources Books.

      Stephen, Lynn ed. Women and Social Movements in Latin America: Power from Below. University of Texas Press.

      Menchu, Rigoberta E. Debray translator. I, Rigoberta Menchu. Verso.

      Other sources:

      Crow, John A. The Epic of Latin America. Berkeley: University of California Press

      Tu´┐Żon Pablos, Julia. Translated by Alan Hynds. Women in Mexico: a Past Unveiled. University of Texas Press.

      Babb, Florence. Between Field and Cooking Pot: The Political Economy of Market women in Peru. University of Texas Press.

      Tice, Karin Elaine. Kuna Crafts, Gender and the Global Economy. University of Texas Press.

      Rock, David. Authoritarian Argentina: The Nationalist Movement, Its History and Its Impact. University of California Press.

      Gorkin Michael, Marta Pineda and Gloria Leal. From Grandmother to Granddaughter: Salvadoran Women’s Stories. University of California Press.

      This is a University Studies Course that satisfies 3 credits of you Global Perspective requirement. The outcomes specified for a USP Global Perspectives course specify that the course provide students the activities and opportunities to:

      Expected Outcomes:

      A. Understand the role of the world citizen and the responsibility world citizens share for their common global future: This course demonstrates how ordinary women have had transformational roles in the social and political spheres of their countries. It will explore how women have chosen to participate in collective action in Chile, Guatemala, El Salvador and Mexico to address human rights issues and how family values can become a part of public life.

      B. Describe and analyze social, economic, political, spiritual, or environmental elements that influence the relations between living beings and their environments or between societies. The main objective is to examine how women’s voices and actions have been and continue to be important with regard to social justice issues in Latin America. What are the political and economic situations which spur particular women to become activists? How have women become actors on the local, national and international stages for human rights?

    3. Identify and analyze specific global issues, illustrating the social,

economic, political, spiritual or environmental differences that may affect their resolution. This course will challenge students to consider how global political economies are interconnected, and moreover how the role of Latin American women in the second half of the 20th century has contributed to the discourse of human rights in their respective countries. First, students will be introduced to so called ’traditional’ gender roles, and then explore through specific ethnographic examples how women have been the catalysts for change. They will also be asked to documents the oral history of a recent Latina immigrant in southeastern Minnesota.

 

For each topic area the salient USP outcomes addressed in that area is identified (A-C)

Tentative Course Schedule

Week 1 Oral histories and social justice in Latin America (A)

Introduction to collecting oral histories as a means to revealing justice issues

Week 2

Guatemala: Ethnic Identities, Social Justice and Rigoberta Menchu (A, B, C)

Read Menchu

Week 3 The Maya Indian World within the Global Structure of the 20th Century

Read Menchu (A, B, C)

Week 4 Social and political structure in Guatemala (A, B, C)

Read Menchu

Week 5

Read Menchu

Week 6 Menchu’s Controversy; Herstory vs their story? Essay due (A, B, C)

Week 7 Midterm Exam

Week 8

Argentina within the 20th century

Read: Guzman Bouvard Introduction and Chapter 1 (A, B, C)

Week 9

Read: Guzman Bouvard Chapters 2-5 (A, B, C)

Week 10

Read: Guzman Bouvard Chapters 6-8

Week 11

Read: Guzman Bouvard Chapters 9-10 Essay due (A, B, C)

Week 12 Broader Theoretical Concerns: Women’s Rights and Human Rights

Read Stephen: Introduction, Chapters 1, 3, 5 (A, B, C)

Week 13

Read Stephen Chapters 6, 7, 8 (A, B, C)

Week 14 Presentation of Research with Latina Women

Week 15 FINAL EXAM (A, B, C)