Approved by Faculty Senate.

 

University Studies Course Approval Submission

Residential College Course Proposal

  1. Department of Program: Residential College
  2. Course Number: 233
  3. Semester Hours: 3
  4. Frequency of Offering: Every other semester
  5. Course Title: Interdisciplinary Approach to Latin American and Caribbean Immigration in the United States

6. Catalog Description: This course focuses on immigration as a process, not an event, and on the diversity of the Latino experience in the US. It integrates historical, economic and cultural sources to achieve a board perspective in understanding the fastest growing ethnic group in the 21rst century.

. (Grade only. Recommended prerequisite: SOC 150)

  1. This is not an existing course previously approved by A2C2
  2. This is a new course proposal.
  3. University Studies Requirement this course would satisfy: An Arts and Science Core: Unity and Diversity/ Global Perspectives
  4. Department Contact Person: Linda D’Amico, 453-2517: ldamico@winona.edu
  5. General Course and Proposal Information:
  6. Interdisciplinary Approach to Latin American and Caribbean Immigration in the United States RC233 is being proposed as a Global Perspectives course. The intent of RC 233 is aligned with the mission of the Residential College to offer interdisciplinary perspectives to WSU students. RC233 will provide students with the analytical tools for understanding immigration as ongoing processes, and further their comprehension of different social theories through the interpretation of qualitative and quantitative data. As a result, it is expected that students’ awareness will increase concerning the diversity of the Latino population and the valuable contributions they make to US society. It is expected that approximately 30 students will take this course, and additional pertinent topics will be addressed as they surface in contemporary society.

     

  7. Course Outcomes:

A. Understand the role of the world citizen and the responsibility world citizens share for their common global future: The main objective of the course, Latin American and Caribbean Immigration in the United States, is for students to grasp how historical and economic dynamics of Latino immigration contribute to the rich cultural diversity in the United States, while raising important social justice issues in both sending and receiving countries.

B. Describe and analyze social, economic, political, spiritual, or environmental elements that influence the relations between living beings and their environments or between societies. Students will be provided with the historical precedents with Latino immigration and settlement in the United States. Where do/have they come from and why? Furthermore they will explore the ramifications of the Bracero Program, and the movement of refugees within a global political context. As a result they will understand the diversity of the Latino population and the valuable contributions they make to US society.

    1. Identify and analyze specific global issues, illustrating the social,

economic, political, spiritual or environmental differences that may affect their resolution. An anthropological perspective of immigration and transnational movements will provide students with an overview of the public policy debate over immigration. Students will be able to analyze the American public’s growing unease with both undocumented and documented immigration and be equipped to propose resolutions.

Sample Syllabus

Interdisciplinary Approach to Latin American and Caribbean Immigration in the United States

Residential College 233

University Studies: Unity and Diversity/ Global Perspectives

Dr. Linda D’Amico

453-2517

e-mail: ldamico@winona.edu

The main objective of the course, Latin American and Caribbean Immigrants in the United States, is for students to grasp how historical and economic dynamics of Latino immigration contribute to the rich cultural diversity in the United States, while raising important social justice issues. Students will be provided with the historical precedents with Latino immigration and settlement in the United States. Furthermore they will explore the ramifications of the Bracero Program, and the movement of refugees within a global political context. As a result they will understand the diversity of the Latino population and the valuable contributions they make to US society.

Students will grasp the relationship between theory and practice through a two pronged approach, namely; 1). The use of ethnographic and historic texts, and; 2). Fieldwork/outreach activites within the Hispanic community within and surrounding Winona. In addition, this course fits into the mission and goal of the Residential College and integrates theoretical with practical aspects of learning. It will provide students with an interdisciplinary perspective for better understanding of immigrant issues. Moreover, students will be challenged and encouraged to develop critical thinking and writing skills which will serve them well in life long learning

This is a University Studies Course that satisfies 3 credits of you Global Perspective requirement. The outcomes specified for a USP Global Perspectives course specify that the course provide students the activities and opportunities to:

A. Understand the role of the world citizen and the responsibility world citizens share for their common global future: The main objective of the course, Latin American and Caribbean Immigration in the United States, is for students to grasp how historical and economic dynamics of Latino immigration contribute to the rich cultural diversity in the United States, while raising important social justice issues in both sending and receiving countries.

B. Describe and analyze social, economic, political, spiritual, or environmental elements that influence the relations between living beings and their environments or between societies. Students will be provided with the historical precedents with Latino immigration and settlement in the United States. Where do/have they come from and why? Furthermore they will explore the ramifications of the Bracero Program, and the movement of refugees within a global political context. As a result they will understand the diversity of the Latino population and the valuable contributions they make to US society.

    1. Identify and analyze specific global issues, illustrating the social,

economic, political, spiritual or environmental differences that may affect their resolution. An anthropological perspective of immigration and transnational movements will provide students with an overview of the public policy debate over immigration. Students will be able to analyze the American public’s growing unease with both undocumented and documented immigration and be equipped to propose resolutions.

 

Course requirements

Students will write a weekly response essay to readings and class discussions. Furthermore, they will keep fieldnotes of their experiences with immigrants and synthesize those into an analysis that interprets the data within the broader theoretical context of readings for the course. There will also be midterm and final exams.

Textbooks:

Chavez, Leo R. Shadowed Lives: Undocumented Immigrants in American Society. Fort Worth: Harcourt, Brace College Publishers.

Suro, Robert. Strangers Among Us: Latino Lives in a Changing America. New York: Vintage Books.

Brown McCarthy, Karen. Mama Lola. Berkeley: University of California Press

Other Sources:

Portes, Alejandro and Rub�n Rumbaut. Immigrant America: A Portrait. Berkeley: University of California Press.

Nod�n Vald�s. Dionicio. Barrios Norte�os: St Paul and Midwestern Mexican Communities in the Twentieth Century. Austin: University of Texas Press.

Ugalde, Antonio and Gilberto C�rdenas. Health & Social Services among International Labor Migrants: A Comparative Perspective. Austin: University of Texas Press.

Portes, Alejandro and Alex Stepick. City on the Edge: the Transformation of Miami. Berkeley: University of California Press.

Sakd�var, Jos� David. Border Matters: Remapping American Cultural Studies. Berkeley: University of California Press.

Menj�var, Cecilia. Fragmented Ties: Salvadoran Immigrant Networks in America. Berkeley: University of California Press.

Walta Hart, Dianne. Undocumeted in L.A.: An Immigrant’s Story. Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources INC.

 

For each topic area the salient USP outcomes addressed in that area is identified (A-D)

Tentative Schedule:

Week 1 Introduction and Fieldwork Assignments

The Ethnographic Method (A, B)

Week 2 Immigration

Read Robert Suro Chapters 1-3 Short essay due (B, C)

Week 3

Read Robert Suro Chapters 4-6 Short essay due (B, C)

Week 4

Read Robert Suro Chapters 7-10 Short essay due (B,C)

Week 5

Read Chavez Introduction and Chapter 1 Short essay due (A,B,C)

Week 6

Read Chavez Chapters 2-4 Short essay due (A,B,C)

Week 7

Read Chavez Chapters 5- 7 Short essay due (A,B,C)

Week 8

Read Chavez Chapters 8-10 MIDTERM (A,B,C)

Week 9 Haitians in the US

Brown: Introduction and Chapter 1

Week 10

Brown: Chapters 2-4 Short essay due (A,B,C)

Week 11

Brown: Chapters 5-7 Short essay due (A,B,C)

Week 12

Brown Chapters 8-10 Short essay due (A,B,C)

Week 13

Discussion of ethnographic fieldwork (A,B,C)

Week 14

Discussion of ethnographic fieldwork (A,B,C)

Week 15 FINAL EXAM