Approved by Faculty Senate.

University Studies Course Approval

 Department or Program: Special Education

Course Number: 400

Semester Hours: 3

Frequency of Offering: Each Semester and Summer

Course Title: Exceptional Children and Youth

Catalog Description:

This course provides an overview of information needed to assist
pre-service and in-service teachers, nurses, social workers, recreation therapists,
adapted physical education specialists and other professionals in understanding the
psychological , educational and life long needs of speech impaired,
emotionally disturbed, behavioral disordered, deaf, blind, mentally
retarded, physically and otherwise health impaired, gifted and economically
under advantaged persons. Cultural diversity and gender fairness are the
context in which development, schooling, transition into the community and
family / societal considerations of exceptional children are studied.

The needs of preschool, elementary, middle, secondary,post-secondary and
senior age disabled and gifted persons are addressed.

This is an existing course previously approved by A2C2: Yes

This is a new course proposal: No

Proposal Category: Social Science

Departmental Contact: Frank Rocco

Email Address: frocco@winona.edu

Department Approval and Date: __________________________

Dean’s Recommendation and Date: __________________________

USS Recommendation and Date: __________________________

A2C2 Recommendation and Date: __________________________

Faculty Senate Recommendation and Date: __________________________

VPAA Recommendation and Date: __________________________

Dean’s Recommendation and Date: __________________________

President’s Decision and Date: __________________________

 

SPED Dept.
College of Education
Winona State University

Department: Special Education Date of Revision: June 2000
Course Number 400 Course Title: Exceptional Children and Youth

Specific Outcomes of the Course and Learning Activities Designed to Meet

Outcomes

The specific outcomes addressed in SPED 400 are those in the Social
Sciences section of the University Studies category. A listing of these
outcomes with a general narrative as to activities which support them
follows. Each outcome is specifically addressed and cross-referenced in
the course syllabus as well.

a. understand humans as individuals and as parts of larger social systems
Utilizing lectures, simulations, videotapes, automated retrieval, guest
speakers, and the Seven Principles of Undergraduate Education, the
following course objectives, as cross-referenced in the syllabus, have been
designed to produce this outcome.

Course objectives are: 1, 7, 11, 14, 21, 24, 28, 32

Estimates of the numbers of disabled in the population range from
approximately 12% to 18%. Learning activities in this course have as their
focus the integration and inclusion of students and adults within the
mainstream population. Readings in the philosophy of integration as well
as the psychological benefit to the disabled and the mainstream population
are included in the course. Projects that support this objective include a
10-20 hour practicum at integrated work sites within the University are a
and assisting teachers in pre-school and post-school integrated programs
for the disabled. Guest speakers who themselves are disabled persons as
well as parents, children, siblings, and spouses of the disabled are
utilized as guest speakers in the class. Their contribution is to detail
firsthand experiences dealing with the integration of the disabled in
school and society.

b. understand the historical context of the social sciences
Utilizing lectures, videotapes and automated retrieval, the following
course objectives, as cross-referenced in the syllabus, have been designed
to produce this outcome.

Course objectives are: 6, 25

The development of services to the disabled from the pre-Christian through
the post-Christian era is emphasized in the course readings and lecture
material. Professor Rocco is developing (completed during the 2001-02
sabbatical year) a dramatic lecture in the person of Jean Marc Itard
(1774-1838) portraying the French physician whose historical work with the
�wild boy of Aveyron� began the modern period in services to disabled
individuals. Currently films and reading material are used to support the
lectures in this area.

c. identify problems and frame research questions relating to humans and
their experience Utilizing automated retrieval and lecture in the context of the Seven
Principles of Undergraduate Education, the following course objectives as
cross-referenced in the syllabus, have been designed to produce this
outcome.

Course objectives are: 23, 29, 34, 35

One library research project deals with the area of research findings and
their impact on current practices in the field. Lectures by the professor
as to current research trends and their impact upon best practice is also included.
The application of research-supported instructional strategies is included
throughout the text utilized in this course. Various research based
theories of the impact of disability upon the behavior of developmentally
disabled students is also included in the lectures and readings.

d. become familiar with the process of theory-building and theoretical
frameworks used by the social sciences
Utilizing lectures, automated retrieval and readings in the text, the
following course objectives as cross-referenced in the syllabus, have been
designed to produce this outcome.

Course objectives are: 4, 5, 15, 29

The developmental psychologies of Piaget and the sensory training theories
of Montessori are the primary theoretical frameworks studied in the course.
The basic philosophic principle is that of inclusion within a free and open
society. Several modern day proponents of the total inclusion philosophy
as well as proponents of the �individual choice� philosophy of integration
are studied through readings and lecture.

e. understand research methods used in the social sciences
Utilizing lecture and library research, the following course objectives, as
cross-referenced in the syllabus, have been designed to produce this
outcome.

Course objectives are: 23, 34

The focus in this course deals primarily with understanding of the
difficulties in conducting human research and the generalization
limitations of such research. No research is conducted by students in the
class, however, understandings of the qualities of good research
(experimental design including double blind design) are stressed.
Limitations of questionnaire research are also included in the lectures and
textbook readings.

f. describe and detail discipline-specific knowledge and its application
Utilizing lectures, simulations, videotapes, automated retrieval, guest
speakers, and the Seven Principles of Undergraduate Education, the
following course objectives, as cross-referenced in the syllabus, have been
designed to produce this outcome.

Course objectives are: 7, 8, 9, 11, 13, 18, 19, 25, 26, 27, 28, 31, 32, 33, 35

Three projects and parts of five quizzes are used to evaluate the students�
knowledge in this area. The discipline-specific knowledge referred to is
the developmental psychology, educational psychology, pre-school and
post-school adjustment of the disabled as well as the requirements of aging
disabled and its� impact upon society.

g. understand differences among and commonalities across humans and their
experience as tied to such variables as gender, race, socioeconomic status,
etc.

All of the course content and methodology deals with this objective.

Utilizing lectures, simulations, videotapes, automated retrieval, guest
speakers, and the Seven Principles of Undergraduate Education, the
following course objectives, as cross-referenced in the syllabus have been
specifically designed to emphasize this outcome.

Course objectives are: 10, 13, 16, 17, 20, 30

The over arching requirement of state and federal laws as related to gender
and race are stressed in the lecture material and readings in the course.
All videotapes and other materials used in the course represent modern day
thinking in terms of gender, race, and socioeconomic equal access to
services. The Council for Exceptional Children Professional Code of
Ethics is utilized in the course. This ethic stresses the equality of
gender, race, and socioecominc status. The textbook has been chosen
because of the author�s sensitivity to these human variables.

Course Syllabus

SPED Dept.
College of Education
Winona State University

Department: Special Education Date of Revision: June 2000
Course Number 400 Course Title: Exceptional Children and Youth

Number of Credits: 3 Frequency of offering: Each semester and summer

Prerequisites: Sophomore status; Grading: Grade only

Recommend Psy. 210

 Course applies to: SPED major, DAPE major, School Social Work and is
elective in many other departments of human services

Catalog Description

This course provides an overview of information needed to assist
pre-service and in-service teachers, nurses, social workers, recreation therapists,
adapted physical education specialists and other professionals in understanding the
psychological , educational and life long needs of speech impaired,
emotionally disturbed, behavioral disordered, deaf, blind, mentally
retarded, physically and otherwise health impaired, gifted and economically
under advantaged persons. Cultural diversity and gender fairness are the
context in which development, schooling, transition into the community and
family / societal considerations of exceptional children are studied.

The needs of preschool, elementary, middle, secondary,post-secondary and
senior age disabled and gifted persons are addressed.

Focus

This course is intended as an introduction to exceptionality for all
students studying in the professionals pursuing Licensure in the various
areas of of human service. It also constitutes the first course in the
special education core for SPED majors.

The following University Studies outcomes/Social Science section, are
addressed in this course.

a. understand humans as individuals and as parts of larger social systems;
see course objectives 1, 7, 11, 14, 21, 24, 28, 32

b. understand the historical context of the social sciences; see course
objectives 6, 25

c. identify problems and frame research questions relating to humans and
their experience; see course objectives 23, 29, 34, 35

d. become familiar with the process of theory-building and theoretical
frameworks used by the social sciences; see course objectives 4, 5, 15, 29

e. understand research methods used in the social sciences; see course
objectives 23, 34

f. describe and detail discipline-specific knowledge and its applications;
see course objectives 2, 3, 7, 8, 9, 11, 13, 18, 19, 25, 26, 27, 28, 31, 32, 33, 35

g. understand differences among and commonalities across humans and their
experience, as tied to such variables as gender, race, socioeconomic status, etc.; see course
objectives 10, 13, 16, 17, 20, 30

Objectives

UNDERSTANDING OF -means in-depth comprehension of the subject area
relating theory to educational practice or human service.

ABILITY TO -means demonstrated skill in the implementation of the subject
area.

KNOWLEDGE OF -means familiarity with and exposure to the subject area.

1. Knowledge of specific disabling conditions and the educational and
societal implications thereof.

2. Ability to effectively communicate the needs and rights of disabled
persons.

3. Knowledge of special education instructional evaluation systems and
transitional services.

4. Knowledge of philosophic issues and psychological principles involved
in working with the disabled, disadvantaged and gifted persons.

5. Ability to explain various philosophical positions that have influenced
thinking in the field of exceptionality and identify persons associated with each
philosophical position.

6. Understanding of historic and current attitudes, problems, practices and
trends in services for exceptional persons within a multicultural context.

7. Ability to identify the major characteristics of disabled, disadvantaged
and gifted youth and adults.

8. Understanding of how to identify and access resources that should guide
professionals in the selection of the most appropriate methods, materials and adult
transitional experiences.

9. Understanding of the role of specialized services such as Chapter 1,
transitional planning, recreational therapy, social work/home/school relations and training
in the fundamental survival skills of daily living.

10. Knowledge of the multi-cultural context of definitions used and
services provided in SPED.

11. Ability to write an behavioral objectives for an individual educational
plan which comply with the requirements of federal and state guidelines.

12. Knowledge of how to adapt lesson plans to the learning needs of the
student.

13. Knowledge of how to utilize direct instruction, outcome based education
and the mastery teaching models of instruction to the benefit of the diverse learner.

14. Understanding of the roles and organizational structures of various
social agencies and the part they play in providing total services to all students.

15. Understanding of the classification of disabilities, their characteristics and continuum
of severity, and their educational and treatment implications.

16. Understanding of similarities and differences among the cognitive, physical, cultural, social,
emotional, and communication needs of typical and exceptional individuals.

17. Understanding of stereotyped attitudes toward people with disabilities
and how these attitudes can positively or negatively impact student behavior.

18. Understanding of the complexity of coexisting disabilities and the implications of this complexity for
treatment and education of children.

19. Understanding of the procedures to address a student's mental health needs.

20. Understanding of the influence of cultural and linguistic diversity
on assessment, eligibility, programming, and placement.

21. Understanding of the full array of the available service options.

22. Understanding of how to adapt and modify curriculum and instruction to
meet individual learner needs.

23. Understanding how to evaluate research findings to appropriately
sequence treatment and/ or instruction.

24. Understanding of the life-long impacts of disabilities on students and
their families.

25. Understanding of the historical and philosophical foundations, legal
bases, and contemporary issues pertaining to services to and the education of children
and youth with a broad range of cognitive impairments and deficits in adaptive behavior.

26. Understanding of the etiology, characteristics, and classifications of
developmental disabilities.

27. Understanding of the current educational definitions, identification
criteria and labeling issues, and entrance and exit criteria for services pertaining to students with
developmental disabilities.

28. Understanding of the general developmental, academic, social, and
functional characteristic of individuals with developmental disabilities to the levels of support needed.

29. Understanding of the research-based theories of behavior problems exhibited by individuals with
developmental disabilities.

30. Understanding of the factors that may influence the over-and under
representation of culturally or linguistically diverse students in programs for students with
developmental disabilities.

31. Understanding of how to assess and accommodate for architectural
barriers in the educational setting.

32. Understanding of the various educational models and setting options
and the selection of appropriate options based on the needs of the students and clients.

33. Understanding of how to design individual plans that integrate
assessment results, family priorities, resources, and concerns that incorporate, when appropriate,
nonacademic and academic goals and the appropriate use of augmentative, adaptive, and assistive technologies.

34. Understanding of how to apply research-supported instructional strategies and practices.

35. Understanding of how to access and evaluate information relevant to the field of developmental
disabilities through consumer and professional organizations, publications, and journals.

Course Outline

Introduction

Human exceptionality/developmental considerations

Identification

Prevalence

Philosophic issues

Historical and multicultural perspectives

IDEA, 504 AND ADA

Legislation

Case law

Current practice

Exceptionalities - Life Perspectives

Mental retardation, emotional/behavioral disturbance, and learning

disabilities

Cross-categorical perspectives

Speech and language Exceptionalities

Hearing and visual Exceptionalities

Physical and health Exceptionalities

Gifted, creative, talented

Interventions in the context of cultural diversity and gender fairness

Early intervention

Resources

IEP

Lesson planning

Working with parents

Disabled seniors

Basic Instructional Plan

Lectures

Small group guided practice

Simulations

Guest speakers who are disabled and gifted

Films and videotapes

Library assignments including retrieval of ERIC on Pals

Evaluation

6 quizzed (best of five utilized)

Final examination

5 projects

Note: Persons who require modifications to the course presentation format

because of disabling or other conditions are asked to develop a joint plan

with the professor that will alleviate the problem.

 

Textbooks

Hallahan and Kauffman, Exceptional Children., 8th edition, Prentice Hall ,

New Jersey, �00

Rocco, Study Guide, WSU Press, ? 00

 

References

In addition to the bibliography in the above materials, each student will

generate needed resources by using the ERIC on PALS retrieval system.

The WWW will also be utilized.