Approved  by Faculty Senate.

 

University Studies Course Approval Form

Department: Theatre and Dance

Course Number: 310

Semester Hours: 3

Frequency of Offering: 1/year; one section of 20 students

Course Title: Survey of Theatre History and Dramatic Literature II

Catalog Description: 310 - Theatre History and Dramatic Literature II-3 S.H.

Quarter Course: 210 and 212.

Survey of the works of major Western playwrights 1800-1970, their cultural contexts and staging practices. No prerequisite for general education students. Prerequisites for THAD majors/minors: ENG 111, THAD 119, HIST 121. Additional assignments required. Concurrent registration in THAD 090 required of majors and minors unless excused by the Department. Offered yearly.

This is an existing course that has previously been approved by A2C2.

Department Contact Person: David Bratt dbratt@winona.edu

This course is submitted to satisfy the requirements of the Writing Flag.

Syllabus Listing of Course Objectives / Outcomes:

Students in this course will

become familiar with Western theatre history from 1800 to the present day, including

key personalities,

theories, and

staging practices, techniques, and conventions;

• become familiar with Western dramatic literature of these periods, including

the plots and principal characters of representative classics, and

similarities and differences between plays of a given period or genre and those which precede or follow them;

• explore the interrelationships between changes in theatrical practices, theories, and conventions; dramatic literature; and the larger society in which it exists;

• practice liberal arts values and skills, including

an appreciation of the continued pertinence of the classics of dramatic literature,

the value of critical and analytical activity as applied to playscripts, and

doing and reporting on research, both orally and in writing.

The University Studies Program specifies that Writing Flag courses must include requirements and learning activities that promote students' abilities to

a. practice the processes and procedures for creating and completing successful writing in their fields.

Students in the course will write take-home essays as part of the midterm and final exams, submit 2-3 brief summaries of scholarly articles, maintain a daily journal, and complete a 2000- to 5000-word research paper. Students will individually meet five times with the instructor during the semester to discuss their progress through the process of this last writing assignment. This last assignment will be returned to the student with comments aimed at focusing a revision of the paper.

b. understand the main features and uses of writing in their fields.

The course's writing assignments represent a variety of types: journal, short essay, summary, and research paper. When time allows, one of the brief papers is a summary of Possin and Hansen's Self-Defense.

c. adapt their writing to the general expectations of readers in their fields.

Some of the instructor's and (when time allows) peers' oral and written responses to a late draft of the research paper address the accuracy of the writer's understanding of audience. Plagiarism is specifically addressed in the course syllabus.

d. make use of the technologies commonly used for research and writing in their fields.

All out-of-class writing (except for journals) is required to be typed. There is no specification regarding the type or number of sources for the research paper; however, the bibliography for the oral reports each student makes must include scholarly, internet, and non-internet sources.

e. learn the conventions of evidence, format, usage, and documentation in their fields.

The research paper must be a "position paper," as defined in Possin and Hansen's Self-Defense and its documentation must conform to Turabian or the MLA Style Sheet. Quality of evidence, clarity of expression, and avoidance of grammatical errors are among the criteria for all writing assignments except the journal.

 

 

THAD 310-Theatre History and Dramatic Literature II

Instructor:

David Bratt

PAC 206 X 5241 e-mail: dbratt@winona.edu

Office Hours: MTWRF 10-11; or by appointment (sign up on office door)

Course Objectives: students in this course will

become familiar with Western theatre history from 1800 to the present day, including

key personalities,

theories, and

staging practices, techniques, and conventions;

• become familiar with Western dramatic literature of these periods, including

the plots and principal characters of representative classics, and

similarities and differences between plays of a given period or genre and those which precede or follow them;

• explore the interrelationships between changes in theatrical practices, theories, and conventions; dramatic literature; and the larger society in which it exists;

• practice liberal arts values and skills, including

an appreciation of the continued pertinence of the classics of dramatic literature,

the value of critical and analytical activity as applied to playscripts, and

doing and reporting on research, both orally and in writing.

Writing Flag: This course is one of two in the theatre major designed to meet the Writing Flag requirement of the WSU University Studies program. Writing Flag courses must include requirements and learning activities that promote students' abilities to:

a. practice the processes and procedures for creating and completing successful writing in their fields;

b. understand the main features and uses of writing in their fields;

c. adapt their writing to the general expectations of readers in their fields;

d. make use of the technologies commonly used for research and writing in their fields; and

e. learn the conventions of evidence, format, usage, and documentation in their fields.

Throughout this syllabus, assignments designed to promote these abilities are followed by the letter(s) of the appplicable abilities and skills.

Required Textbooks:

Stanton, ed., Camille and Other Plays, Hill and Wang

Watson and McKernie, A Cultural History of Theatre, Longman

Worthen, Harcourt Brace Anthology of Drama (3rd edition—not 2nd), HBJ

Horner, Webb, Miller Harbrace College Handbook (13th ed or later) or Kirkland, Dilworth, Concise

English Handbook (4th ed or later)

Recommended Textbooks:

Possin and Hansen, Self-Defense: A Student Guide to Writing Position Papers

A.M. Nagler, A Source Book in Theatrical History, Dover

Turabian, A Manual for Writers of Term Papers or The MLA Style Sheet

 

All these books will probably be used when the course is next taught in the Fall of 2001. In addition, Possin and Hansen, Turabian, Watson and McKernie, and Worthen will be used in THAD 210-Theatre History and Dramatic Literature I in the Spring of 2000-2001.

Course Requirements: Playscript readings, readings in theatre history textbook, reserve readings, journal entries (B) (optional for non-THAD majors); oral reports (D), short summary papers (A, B, C, D), research paper (A, B, C, D, E); attendance at the Guthrie’s production of Hedda Gabler on 9/16 ($15-$20) and at the two THAD Main Season productions for the semester; quizes, midterm and final exam.

Additional requirements for THAD majors and minors:

1. In addition to the playscripts studied in class, THAD majors will read and submit written reports on two additional playscripts from among the historical eras covered in the course.

One report will be in the form of an action chart, completed according to the format learned in THAD 119-Play Reading; the other report will be in the form of a 2-page essay discussing the 'goal' of a major character, also according to the format learned in 119-Play Reading. Due dates for these reports are on the Schedule pages of the syllabus.

2. THAD majors will keep a journal. See the ‘Journal’ section of the syllabus for details.

3. THAD majors and minors will do crew work. See the ‘Production Crew Requirements’ section of the syllabus for details.

Grading: Oral reports, quizes, midterm exam, final exam, and research paper each count 20% toward the course grade. Failure to complete any one of these elements will result in a course grade of E.

In addition, course grades may be raised or lowered as much as 20% for exceptionally weak or strong class attendance, participation in discussions, and work on other assignments.

Attendance: You are expected to treat attendance in this course as seriously as you would attendance at a paying job in your career field. In such a job, excessive absences indicate to an employer that your heart, mind, or both are elsewhere, and your future with the employer will not be bright.

You may skip class this semester no more than three times without penalty; missing class the day before or after a holiday will count as two skips; quizes will not be made up; students who skip on a day they are scheduled to give a report or take an exam must contact the instructor in advance if they wish to make up the missed work.

The grades of students who miss due dates for research paper activities will be lowered as much as an additional 10%. Grades of papers submitted late will be lowered 1/3 grade per day.

Quizes: See the Schedule page of this syllabus for the dates of quizes on plays. In addition, you can expect other unannounced quizes on textbook and other assigned readings.

All quizes: the lowest quiz grade will be dropped. Quiz questions will deal with details which you should be able to remember after a careful reading of the assignment.

Quizes on plays: given on the first day of class discussion of that play. To earn credit for two of the 4-5 questions on the quiz, you must come to class with two questions, already written out on the quiz paper, which ask about problems which you had trying to understand the play. These questions must deal with the events of the plot or the actions of the characters; questions or comments such as "I had trouble remembering who was who" or "Why do they speak in verse?" will not receive credit.

Midterm and final exams: each will cover about 1/2 of the semester's work. Each will consist of essay (A, B, C, D, E) and objective parts; each part will count 50%.

The essay part will be take-home. The objective part will consist of multiple choice, true/false, and short answer questions about material covered in the textbook, anthology, individual playscripts, and class activities. In addition, there will be a series of fill-in-the-blank questions, one for each play studied, requiring you to date each play, correctly spell its title and the names of the author and major characters, and describe the plot.

"Historicizing" report (A, B, C, D, E): 1-2 pages, typed, double-spaced, 1" margins, maximum 12-point font. Summarize the content of McConachie, "Historicizing the Relations of Theatrical Production," to be distributed. This will be subject to the instructor’s writing policy, distributed separately, i.e., if the paper’s grammar, spelling, punctuation, etc., is not up to college writing standards, the paper will have to be revised and resubmitted.

Research paper (A, B, C, D, E): 2000 word minimum; 5000 word maximum. Typed, double-spaced, 1" margins, maximum 12-point font, with footnotes or endnotes for research sources cited and bibliography of sources consulted, following the format of Turabian’s A Manual for Writers of Term Papers or MLA Style Sheet.

The research paper you write for this course should be a position paper. (To understand the meaning of this term, see Possein and Hanson, Self-Defense, a textbook for this course.)

The research paper may not be about a play we study in the course or which you write about in one of your THAD Major reports. It may not substantially rehash material covered in your oral report. Possible topics include, but are not limited to, the following topics about which there is controversy:

the genre of a particular playscript about which critics disagree

• the "goal" or "spine" of a character (or of the playscript as a whole) about which critics disagree

• various positions on the issue of a director’s responsibilities and freedoms when directing a classical playscript

• the ‘paradox of acting’ (cool or warm heart–see the history textbook for an introduction)

• ‘inside-out’ vs. ‘outside-in’ acting

• ‘color-blind’ casting or some other gender- or racial-based issue (see articles by Robert Brustein and August Wilson in issues of American Theatre)

• development of the box set

Due dates for elements of the paper-writing process are listed on the schedule. These include submission of topic, preliminary list of sources, notes taken from sources, outline (including thesis statement, major points, and subpoints), and submission and resubmission of the final draft. Except for the last two of these, all are to be presented to the instructor during an appointment in his office. Failure to keep these appointments will lower your grade in the course.

This research paper is to meet the instructor's writing standards policy, described on a separate sheet. A paper's grade will be lowered 1/3 grade each time it needs to be resubmitted beyond the initial resubmission built into the course’s schedule of activities; it will also be lowered 1/3 grade for each day it is late. Students whose papers do not conform to the standards described in the instructor's writing policy by the beginning of the exam period will receive an F in the course.

Oral reports (D): you will present a group oral report with 1-2 fellow students.

The report should be 30 minutes in length. It will be graded on the basis of content and delivery--that is, both on the accuracy and completeness of what is said (and what is presented on the hand-outs) and how well (how confidently and clearly) it is presented. The report’s overall quality should be that of an important oral presentation to an employer. In most cases, everyone in the group will receive the same grade, so be sure to monitor and critique the work of your fellow group members.

The topics are: Stanislavski/Antoine/Naturalism; Wagner/Appia/Craig/New Stagecraft; Piscator/Brecht/ Epic Theatre; Artaud/Grotowski/Living Theatre/Schechner; and Absurdism. To learn more about the topics, scan the history textbook and consult bibliographical items in your 109-Play Reading bibliography.

The oral report should:

deal with three topics:

--what do the persons know or believe about theatre?

--how do they know it? or why do they believe as they do?

--what influence did they have on the later practice of theatre?

In particular, the report should not spend more than about 2 minutes giving biographical details unless these details bear directly on the topics above.

• include hand-outs for class members to help them retain your most important points. At the very least, the hand-outs should include an outline of the points that will be covered in the report (to guide listeners' note-taking) and a bibliography of sources consulted for the report. Hand-outs which do more than this will have a positive effect on your grade.

• include a section which points out the relevance the topic has for theatre practice in the years before or after...in other words, "What are the links or connections between the topic and what happened before or happens later in theatre?"

use a minimum of 5research sources besides the course textbook and the readings your classmates will be doing. Of these 5 sources, no more than one may be an article in an encyclopedia or dictionary entry, no more than one may be a textbook for a survey of theatre history course, and no more than one may be a website.

• avoid sloppy oral vocabulary, including ‘He goes...’ (instead of ‘He said....’) and fillers (‘um,’ ‘like,’ ‘you know,’ ‘whatever,’ etc.).

show evidence of considerable planning within the group regarding the material to be covered, the organization of material, and the accuracy of each member’s contributions.

• show evidence of considerable practice before presentation to the class (out loud, with all group members present and critiquing). Practice the report out loud at least twice.

Plagiarism (E): All work produced by a student must represent that student's personal effort, unless the instructor specifically permits or requires that it be done by a group. Papers and other work which a student prepares for class (including quiz questions) will contain only the student's own words or, if the material originated with someone else, will enclose the quoted words in quotation marks and supply complete bibliographical information in a footnote or endnote.

Summaries or paraphrases of the words or ideas of other people must also be documented in this fashion.

Work that does not exhibit these characteristics is a form of academic dishonesty known as plagiarism. In addition, the making of false statements designed to earn a student the right to make up missed work or cheating on quizes or tests are also violations of academic honesty.

Any of the above will result in the student's immediate expulsion from the course with a grade of E in the course. In addition, such activities may result in additional sanctions, up to and including suspension or expulsion from the university.

Course Journal (B, D): If you are a theatre major, you are required to keep a journal and hand it in to your instructor at least twice during the semester. The entries for this journal are to be typed or word-processed (although sketches or drawings may be done in pencil).

If you type, use paper that is 3-hole punched and clean-edged; store and transport the entries in a 3-ring binder. If you keep your entries on a computer disk, submit printed copies to the instructor.

These journal entries may be 'first-draft' quality: spelling and punctuation are not important issues.

After the course is over, save this journal: you will need its entries to help you do work in the THAD 495-Senior Seminar course.

Each entry should consist of two parts:

(a) a brief log of your activities in the course since your previous entry; and

(b) more extended writing about one of the following topics (your instructor may specify which of these you should concentrate on):

your reactions to others' evaluations of your work. For instance

1. what points did they make?

2. did you agree or disagree? why?

3. what specifically will you do as a result of their feedback to you?

your thoughts about the process by which you are completing a project in the course. Use the following items as a guide:

1. comment about your progress through various steps or stages of the process: where are you getting ideas? how are you exploring the subject? what problems are you encountering? how are you addressing these problems?

2. what are the strengths of your work? have others pointed these strengths out to you? do you believe them? are they strengths that you yourself recognized?

3. what is there about the work you are doing that you are still uneasy with?

4. what makes your most effective pieces of work (as a performer, designer, or technician) different from your less effective pieces?

your thoughts now about a journal entry you made earlier in the semester

• your reactions to a comment your instructor made about your journal entries

• your perception about connections between your work in this course and material in a course or courses you have taken

• your perception of connections between your work in this course and experiences you've had outside your college coursework

• your perception about connections between this course and the work you hope to do after you graduate

RESERVE READINGS

All reserve materials are at the Reserve Desk on two-hour reserve.

Ch. 12-Romanticism: read ‘Romanticism’ xeroxes in Bratt’s PAM box

Ch 15-In Search of a New Theatre: read ‘Modern Realism’ xeroxes in Bratt’s PAM box

Stanislavski/Naturalism: read

"Creative Work" and "Production Plan" and "Scene," in Cole and Chinoy, DIRECTORS ON DIRECTING;

also Chap. 2-3 in Roose-Evans, EXPERIMENTAL THEATRE;

 

 

Wagner, Appia and Craig: read

"Light and Space" and "Artist of the Theatre," in Cole and Chinoy, DIRECTORS ON DIRECTING;

also Chap. 7 in Roose-Evans, EXPERIMENTAL THEATRE

Brecht/Epic Theatre: read

"Little (or Short) Organum," in Cole, PLAYWRIGHTS ON PLAYWRITING or in Willett, BRECHT ON THEATRE;

also Chap. 9 in Roose-Evans, EXPERIMENTAL THEATRE

Artaud/Grotowski: read

"Theatre and the Plague" and "No More Masterpieces" in THE THEATRE AND ITS DOUBLE;

also Chap. 10 in Roose-Evans, EXPERIMENTAL THEATRE;

also Schechner,"Six Axioms" in TULANE DRAMA REVIEW (Spring 1968);

also "Towards a Poor Theatre" and "He Wasn't Entirely Himself" in Grotowski, TOWARDS A POOR THEATRE;

also Chap. 11 in Roose-Evans, EXPERIMENTAL THEATRE

Absurdism: read "Introduction" in Esslin, THEATRE OF THE ABSURD

• "American Theatre-The Group Theatre": read

pp. 451-56, 472-89, 501-12, and 544-52 in EDUCATIONAL THEATRE JOURNAL (now known as THEATRE JOURNAL), vol. 28 (December 1976) in Bratt’s PAM box

PRODUCTION CREW (or "LAB") REQUIREMENTS:

 

 

If you are:

 

and if you are:

 

then you have this Main Season** crew responsibility during the semester:

 

A THAD major or minor student*

a member of the cast of a Main Season production

enrolled in a THAD course that counts in your THAD major or minor

both enrolled in a THAD course that counts in your THAD major or minor and a member of the cast of a Main Season production

 

5 crew hours plus strike

5 crew hours

 

5 crew hours plus strike

A non-THAD major or minor student*

 

a member of the cast of a Main Season production

5 crew hours plus strike

* The phrase "THAD major or minor" refers to the theatre major and minor, the dance minor, and the Speech/Theatre Arts teaching major and minor.

** The phrase "Main Season" refers to the 4-5 annual productions on which THAD faculty have major artistic assignments.

 

These crew responsibilities will normally be in addition to any production work you are doing as a paid crew head or a paid shop assistant. If you are enrolled in THAD 291-R&P, these crew responsibilities are also in addition to production work you do to fulfill the requirements of R&P.

These crew responsibilities will be cancelled if you are doing or have done non-291-R&P production work during the semester as an unpaid crew head on a Main Season production.

Students who do not fulfill their crew responsibility as a Main Season cast member will not be cast in another Main Season production for twelve months. Students who do not fulfill their crew responsibility as a student in a THAD course will have their final course grade lowered in accordance with the syllabus for the course.

This policy will be administered by your course instructor or the THAD faculty Production Manager.

 

 

THAD GRADING:

Letter Grade

%

Honor Points

Definition

A

90-100

4.00

The work of the highest excellence, showing a superior overall grasp of content as well as independent and creative thinking in the subject area.

B

80-89

3.00

Unusual achievement in which the student reveals exceptional insight and ability.

C

70-79

2.00

Satisfactory achievement on the college level: the work has been done conscientiously and shows no considerable deficiency in quantity or quality.

D

60-69

1.00

The work is marginally below the quality normally expected for college work.

F

below 60

0.00

The work is distinctly unsatisfactory at the college level.

Date

Activity

Assignment

 

8/28

Intro to course

   

8/30

Discuss Ch. 12-13; ‘historicizing’ assignment

Read Ch 12-13, Romanticism reserve readings

 

9/1

Discuss Ch. 12-13

Guthrie $15-20 due for 9/16 trip; submit report preferences

 

9/4

No class

   

9/6

Discuss Glass of Water; quiz

Read Glass of Water (in Camille and Other Plays)

 

9/8

Discuss ‘Historicizing’ and ‘Economic"

Submit ‘Historicizing’ paper; read it and ‘Economic’

Appt: Paper topic by 9/15

ABDE

A

9/11

Discuss Ch 15, reserve readings

Read Ch 15, Realism reserve readings

 

9/13

Discuss The Father; quiz

Read Father and Zola (866 ff)

 

9/15

Discuss The Father

Appt: Paper sources by 9/22

AE

 

Hedda Gabler, Guthrie, 9/16, 10 a.m.

   

9/18

Discuss Hedda

   

9/20

Stanislavski/Naturalism report

Read Stanislavski (883 ff), Cima (901 ff), Stan/Naturalism reserve readings

 

9/22

Discuss Cherry Orchard, quiz, video

Read Cherry Orchard

 

9/25

Discuss Cherry Orchard

   

9/27

Discuss Earnest, quiz, video?

Read Importance of Being Earnest

 

9/29

Discuss Earnest, video?

Appt: Paper notes by 10/6

AE

10/2

Discuss Major Barbara, quiz

Read Major Barbara

 

10/4

Discuss Major Barbara

   

10/6

Wagner/Appia/Craig report; take-home essays

Read Wagner/Appia/Craig reserve readings

 

10/9

No class

THAD majors’ 1st play report due 10/11

ABDE

10/11

Discuss 6 Characters, quiz, video

Read 6 Characters in Search of an Author

 

10/13

Discuss6 Characters

Appt: Paper thesis by 10/20

A

 

The Foreigner, 10/12-15, 7:30 p.m.

   

10/16

Discuss Hairy Ape and Miller

Read Hairy Ape, Miller(1162 ff)

 

10/18

Midterm test

 

ABDE

10/20

Discuss Ch 16

Read Ch 16

 

10/23

Piscator/Brecht/Epic Theatre report

Read Brecht reserve readings, Brecht (889 ff)

 

10/25

Discuss Mother Courage, quiz

Read Mother Courage

 

10/27

Discuss Mother Courage

   
 

To Fool the Eye, Guthrie, 10/28, 10 a.m.

   

10/30

Discuss Glass Menagerie, quiz

Read Glass Menagerie

 

11/1

Discuss Glass Menagerie

   

11/3

Discuss Ch. 17

Read Ch 17; Appt: Paper outline or draft by 11/9

AE

11/6

Artaud/Grotowski/Living Theatre report

Read Artaud (894 ff) and Artaud/Grotowski reserve readings

 

11/8

Absurdism report

Read Esslin (874 ff) and Absurdism reserve readings

 

11/10

No class

   

11/13

Discuss Endgame, quiz; Godot video

Read Endgame

 

11/15

Discuss Endgame; New Tenant video

   

11/17

Discuss Homecoming, quiz

Read Homecoming

 

11/20

Discuss Homecoming

Submit paper in final form by 11/21

ABDE

11/22

No class

THAD majors’ 2nd play report due 11/27

ABD

11/24

No class

   

Date

Activity

Assignment

 
       

11/27

Federal Theatre and Group Theatre lecture

Read American/Group Theatre reserve readings

 

11/29

American theatre lecture

   

12/1

Discuss Ch. 18; take-home essays

Read Ch 18

 
 

Christmas Carol, 11/28-12/2

   

12/4

Discuss Cloud Nine, quiz

Read Cloud Nine; resubmit paper in final form today

ABCDE

12/6

Discuss Cloud Nine, Fires in the Mirror

Read Fires in the Mirror

 

12/8

Discuss Fires in the Mirror

   

Final exam: Monday, 12/13, 1 p.m. ABDE