Approved by Faculty Senate

UNIVERSITY STUDIES
COURSE PROPOSAL
SOCIAL SCIENCE OUTCOMES

   1.  Understand humans as individuals and as parts of larger social system:
        the subject matter, and text, describes in detail the way in which culture and societal
        structures and processes, socialize individuals to a wide range of relationships and
        expected patterns of behavior and thought.

    2.  Understand the historical context of the social sciences:
         The subject matter, covered in both lectures and text, describes the historical development            of sociology with a special emphasis upon both historical and current contributions of    
         specific sociologists.

    3.  Identify problems and frame research questions relating to humans and their experience:
         The research component of the class, using class exercises and computer-based database,
         has students identifying problems associated with each of the chapters in the text and
         framing research questions through a systematic set of questions. The students each write
         up the exercise In terms of what they expect to see in the relationship hypothesis), what
         social processes they think account for it (explanation), then report what the actual    
         statistical analysis shows (analysis and results) and finally, what they think might be the
        case when they are wrong (reinterpretation).

     4.  Become familiar with the process of theory-building and theoretical frameworks used by
          the social sciences:
          The subject matter, covered in both lectures and text, applies the major sociological             theories to each of the specialized domains of knowledge in sociology. Special units
          emphasize the test of alternative theories to account for patterns of behavior.

      5. Understanding research methods used in the social sciences:
          The process of identification and framing in #3 above is a major part of this process in the             classroom. During the course of the semester students are introduced to levels of            
          measurement, experimental, survey and other types of research. They also learn how to  
          interpret bar graphs, one and two variable tables, single, two-variable and multiple
          variable analysis, including scattergrams. The appropriate statistical tests are used and
         explained at each point in the learning of research methods.

     

    6. Describe and detail discipline-specific knowledge and its applications:
        The text has a special section in each chapter which reports on the application of
        sociological methods and theories to special applied problems.

    7. Understand differences among and commonalities across humans and their experiences:
        The text and the lectures both emphasis the cultural/ethnic/status diversities across
        societies with a focus on the United States. In addition, students write comparative essays
        based upon exposure to the "Heart of the Dragon" video series about life in contemporary
        Chinese society.

 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY (150) SECTION 1

Monday/Wednesday 2:00 p.m. – 3:20 p.m.
Dr. Brian C. Aldrich, Professor
Office: 223 Minn´┐Ż Hall
Office Hours: MTWR 3:30-4:30 p.m. & by appointment
Email: baldrich@winona.edu
Phone: 457-5421

Objective of course: To introduce students to basic sociological concepts, methods, and substantive conclusions about human society.

Required text: J. Farley, Sociology, 4th edition, Prentice-Hall

Academic Assessment:
Active learning write-ups – films, data analysis 33%
Chapter quizzes                                                 33%
Multiple choice exams                                          33%
(In-class group review class period of exam)

(Make-ups can be arranged for the exams; students are expected to be in class for chapter quizzes and write-ups)

 

ACTIVE LEARNING ASSIGNMENTS

There are two forms of active learning assignments: comparative essays based upon viewing a segment of "Heart of the Dragon" and comparing it to U.S. society, and writing up the four questions of the Crawford methods for the data analysis exercises. These assignments are graded pass/no credit.

The comparative essays will be assigned at the beginning of the video. An example would be to compare the core values of Chinese society as shown in the film, with the core values of American society as reported in the text.

The Crawford method entails, for each data analysis exercise, answering the four questions of "What do you expect to see?", "Why do you expect, in terms of social processes, to see it?", "What was reported in the data analysis?", and "What is your reinterpretation if your expectations were not met?"

 

CHAPTER QUIZZES

There is a quiz over each new chapter in the text. These quizzes count for one-third of the grade. They emphasize the concepts being covered in that part of the course.

 

MULTIPLE CHOICE EXAMS

The five multiple-choice exams cover concepts, theories, sociologists, and applied knowledge.

Students will form groups the day of the exam and study the questions (without the answers). These study sheets may be used to answer the questions on the exam. These exams count for one-third of the grade in the course.

PART I.  INTRODUCTION

WEEK 1
8/28  CH. 1 Sociology (2) (3)
          Review:  Organization of Course

8/30  CH. 2 How Sociology is Done (2)
          Quiz - End of Period, over Chapter 2
           Data analysis-Family Types Across Cultures  (3) (5) (7)

PART II. SOCIETY AND HUMAN INTERACTIONS

WEEK 2
9/4  Labor Day - No Class
9/6  CH. 3 Perspectives (4)
        Quiz-End of Period, over Chapter 3
        Lecture

WEEK 3
9/11 CH 3 Perspectives-Continued
          Film:  Heart of Dragon - Remembering- What Holds A
          Society Together? (6) (7)
9/13  EXAM over chapters 1-2-3 (50 Questions; in-class
          review)

WEEK 4
9/18 Ch. 4 Culture and Social Structure (1( (5)
         Film:  H of D, Cring (6) (7)
         Quiz -  End of Period
9/20 Data Analysis-Comparative Cultures-Cooking,
         Sexual Permissiveness (3) (5) (7)

WEEK 5
9/25  CH. 5 Socialization (6) (1)
          Data Analysis:  Education and Values (3) (5) (7)
          Quiz, End of Period
9/27  Lecture/Film (7)

WEEK 6
10/2  No Class-Student Fall Break
10/4  Ch. 6 Sex, Gender and society (4) (6) (1)
          Quiz-End of Period
          Data Analysis/Lecture (3) (5) (7)

WEEK 7
10/9  Film/Lecture (7)
10/11 Exam -50 Questions -Chapters 4-5-6

PART III STRATIFICATION:  STRUCTURE INEQUALITY

WEEK 8
10/16  Ch. 9 Social Stratification (6) (1)
            Quiz
             Lecture/Film: H of D -Living (7)
10/18  Data Analysis-Social Stratification (3) (5) (7)

 WEEK 9
10/23 CH 10 STRATIFICATION (1)(6)
                QUIZ
                LECTURE/FILM: H OF D – WORKING (7)
10/25 DATA ANALYSIS (3)(5)(7)

WEEK 10.
10/30 CH 11 RACE AND ETHNIC RELATIONS (1)(6)
                QUIZ
                LECTURE – CASE STUDIES – RAWANDA, JAPAN (3)
                DATA ANALYSIS – RACIAL ATTITUDES (3)(5)(7)
11/1 EXAM – 50 QUESTIONS OVER CHAPTERS 9-10-11

 

PART IV. SOCIAL INSTITUTIONS

WEEK 11
11/6 CH 13 MARRIAGES AND FAMILIES (6)(1)
        QUIZ
        LECTURE/ANALYSIS (3)(5)(7)
11/8 FILM: H OF D – MARRYING (7)

WEEK 12
11/13 CH 15 RELIGION (1)(6)
                QUIZ
                LECTURE/ANALYSIS (3)(5)(7)
11/15 FILM: H OF D – BELIEVING (7)

WEEK 13
11/20 CH 18 URBANIZATION (1)(6)
                QUIZ
                HUMAN DEVELOPMENT INDEX/CORRELATES (3)(5)(7)
11/22 THANKSGIVING BREAK – NO CLASS

WEEK 14
11/27 DATA ANALYSIS – URBANIZATION CORRELATES (3)(5)(7)
11/29 EXAM 50 QUESTIONS OVER CHAPTERS 13-15-18

PART V. SOCIAL CHANGE

WEEK 15
12/4 CH 19 COLLECTIVE BEHAVIOR AND SOCIAL MOVEMENTS (1)(6)
        QUIZ
        LECTURE/FILM (7)
12/6 DATA ANALYSIS – ABORTION CORRELATES (3)(5)(7)

 FINAL EXAM (SEE FALL SCHEDULE) OVER CHAPTER 19