Approved by Faculty Senate April 14, 2003


SOC 491

COMMUNITY POLICING AND ADMINISTRATION

University Oral Flag Course

3 Credit Hours

Spring 2003

Rev. 1/03

 

PROFESSOR:          James R. Kobolt

                                    Office:              Minne’ Hall, Room 128

                                    Office Phone: 457-5564       Home: 507-864-3520

                                    E-Mail:             jkobolt@winona.edu

                                    Internet:           http://course1.winona.edu/jkobolt/

                                    Course Site:  http://bb.winona.edu/

 

OFFICE HOURS:     MWF   10:00a -11:00a         12:00p-1:00p

                                    TTh      10:00a - 12:00p

 

                                    Periodically other appointments prevent strict instructor confinement to the office during office hours.  To insure proper attention to each student, appointments are encouraged.  Appointments need not be confined to office hours.

COURSE

DESCRIPTION:        This course is designed to assist the student in identifying and implementing a community policing philosophy using contemporary law enforcement organizational management processes.

INSTRUCTIONAL

GOAL:                        To assist the student in developing a basic understanding of contemporary police initiatives to impact the crime problem.

METHOD OF

INSTRUCTION:        The method of instruction will consist student class preparations and presentation of class assignments, audio-visual aids, group work and outside reading.

LEARNING

ACTIVITIES:              Student class development and presentations

                                    Internet quizzes and tests

                                    Reading assignments

                                    Course notebook development

                                    Blackboard web activities

 

COURSE

REQUIREMENTS:  Attendance:  

                                    Each student is expected to attend all classes personally. Any absence virtually insures missing important components of the course content, which are supported by lecture and demonstration.

 

                                    Assignments:

                                    Each student is expected to complete all assignments on time.   Failure to do so will result in a reduced grade.  Emergency situations will be considered on a case-by-case basis.  Notebooks will be graded as announced.

           

                                    Extra Credit: 

                                    Extra credit work will be assigned at the discretion of the professor.  The student is to focus on meeting the basic student requirements.  In the event of a verified medical emergency or prolonged illness that results in excessive absences, a student will be assigned make-up work to ensure proper exposure to information presented in class.

 

                                    Student Materials Needed: 

   Notebook.  The student will be required to have the course textbook, a 1” to 1.5” three ring black notebook, and note taking materials. 

   Computer, Printer and Internet Connection.  All quizzes and tests will be taken online.  The student should insure they have adequate and stable Internet access.

 

                                    Testing:         

                                    The student will be required to take all quizzes and tests on-line.  The student will be notified of test dates and the student will have 24 hours from the notification to take the test.

 

                                                            Blackboard:  

                                                            A variety of assignments (quizzes, tests, discussion questions, etc) will be conducted with the Blackboard program outside of the classroom.  The student should insure personal familiarity with the program and check the Blackboard class daily for updates and assignments.

 

ADD/DROP:                          The Add/Drop Class Policy is the same as that in the current University Catalogue.

 

SPECIAL NEEDS:   Students with special needs may contact the instructor or Nancy Dumke, Disability Services Coordinator (457-5600).

 

ACADEMIC

INTEGRITY:                           Students are expected to do their own work.  Plagiarism and/or cheating will be thoroughly investigated by the instructor.  Evidence of plagiarism and/or cheating, or lack of cooperation in any plagiarism/cheating inquiry, will result in a zero being given for the assignment or test where the evidence exists.  The only exception to this rule is the Internet course notes for the student course notebook.

COURSE

GRADING:                 Grading Scale:           The course grading scale is:

                                   

                                    A = 100 - 90%            B = 89 - 80%              C = 79 - 70%

                                    D = 69 - 60%              F  = 59 - 00%

 

TEXTBOOKS:          Required:

                                                Cordner, G. & Sheehan, R. (1999) Police Administration. 4th Ed., Anderson Publishing: Cincinnati, OH

                                                McDonald, P. (2002) Managing Police Operations: Implementing the New York Crime Control Model - CompStat, Wadsworth Press: Belmont, CA

                                    Optional:

                                                Oliver, W. (2000) Community Policing: Classical Readings, Prentice Hall: Upper Saddle River, NJ

 

COURSE

TEST

SCHEDULE:                         The following schedule is provided for planning purposes only.  Exact dates will be determined as progress is made through the course curriculum.

 

Test #1

After Goal #4

Final

Monday May 5, 2003

10:30a-12:30p

 

PORTFOLIO:            This course is a portfolio course.   The student must include two writing assignments in their student portfolio.

 

University

Studies:                     This course is designated a university oral flag course.  To meet this designation, the course will include practices and procedures that you will need to be a successful speaker in law enforcement.  Significant credit in this course will come from student presentations.  You will be required to practice the main features of public speaking in law enforcement, and adapt your presentations to specific audiences.  You will be required to use technologies commonly used in law enforcement. These overall outcomes are integrated as activities and requirements in the Course Goals and Objectives.

 


COMMUNITY POLICING AND ADMINISTRATION

COURSE GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

AND

CORRESPONDING READING ASSIGNMENTS

 

Goal 1:

The student will know about research resulting in reform in police practices and police administration.

 

Reading Assignments

            Text:

Police Administration Chapters 1 and 2

 

            Articles:

            “The evolving strategy of policing”

            “The new policing: confronting complexity”

            “Police and communities: the quiet revolution”

            “KC Preventive Patrol Experiment”

            “Policing and the fear of crime”

            “Police strategies to reduce the fear of crime”

 

Objective A:

In a group project setting, the student will participate in a forum where the important concepts of Police Administration Chapter 1 and “The evolving strategies of policing” article are identified, defined, discussed and correlated.

Objective B:

In a group project setting, the student will participate in a forum where the important concepts of Police Administration Chapter 1 and “The new policing: confronting complexity” article are identified, defined, discussed and correlated.

Objective C:

In a group project setting, the student will participate in a forum where the important concepts of Police Administration Chapter 1 and the “Police and communities: the quiet revolution” article are identified, defined, discussed and correlated.

Objective D:

In a group project setting, the student will participate in a forum where the important concepts of Police Administration Chapter 2 and the “KC Preventive Patrol Experiment” article are identified, defined, discussed and correlated.

Objective E:

In a group project setting, the student will participate in a forum where the important concepts of Police Administration Chapter 2 and the “Policing and the fear of crime” article are identified, defined, discussed and correlated.

Objective F:

In a group project setting, the student will participate in a forum where the important concepts of Police Administration Chapter 2 and the “Police strategies to reduce citizen fear of crime” article are identified, defined, discussed and correlated.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Goal 2:

The student will know about the importance of philosophy in policing.

 

Reading Assignments

Text:

Managing Police Operations: Implementing the New York Crime Control Model CompStat

Chapters 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, & 8

 

Articles:

“Broken windows: The police and neighborhood safety”

“Improving Policing: A problem-oriented approach”

“Crime and policing”

“Understanding community policing: A framework for action”

 

Objective A:

In a group project setting, the student will participate in a forum where the important concepts of Managing Police Operations: Implementing the New York Crime Control Model CompStat Chapters 1 & 2 and the “Broken windows: The police and neighborhood safety” article are identified, defined, discussed and correlated.

Objective B:

In a group project setting, the student will participate in a forum where the important concepts of Managing Police Operations: Implementing the New York Crime Control Model CompStat Chapters 3 & 4 and the “Improving policing: A problem-oriented approach” article are identified, defined, discussed and correlated.

Objective C:

In a group project setting, the student will participate in a forum where the important concepts of Managing Police Operations: Implementing the New York Crime Control Model CompStat Chapters 5 & 6 and the “Crime and policing” article are identified, defined, discussed and correlated.

Objective D:

In a group project setting, the student will participate in a forum where the important concepts of Managing Police Operations: Implementing the New York Crime Control Model CompStat Chapters 7 & 8 and the “Understanding community policing: A framework for action” article are identified, defined, discussed and correlated.

 

Goal 3:

The student will understand the concept of leadership by investigating the impact of vision, mission and values on an organization.

 

Reading Assignments

            Text:

Police Administration Chapters 3, 6 and 12

 

            Articles:

            “A staircase to strategic planning: Vision”

            “Values in policing”

            “Integrity for a community policing environment” (Sections 1-9)

 

Objective A:

In a group project setting, the student will participate in a forum where the important concepts of Police Administration Chapter 6 and the “A staircase to strategic planning: Vision” article are identified, defined, discussed and correlated.

Objective B:

In a group project setting, the student will participate in a forum where the important concepts of Police Administration Chapter 3 and the “Values in policing” article are identified, defined, discussed and correlated.

Objective C:

In a group project setting, the student will participate in a forum where the important concepts of Police Administration Chapter 12 and the “Integrity for a community policing environment” article are identified, defined, discussed and correlated.

 

Goal 4:

The student will understand the concept of administration by investigating the use of strategy by a police organization.

 

Reading Assignments

            Text:

Police Administration Chapters 5, 10, 11 and 13

 

            Articles:

            “The strategic management of police resources”

            “Implementing community policing: The administrative problem”

            “Community policing and the police officer”

 

Objective A:

In a group project setting, the student will participate in a forum where the important concepts of Police Administration Chapter 5 and the “The strategic management of police resources” article are identified, defined, discussed and correlated.

Objective B:

In a group project setting, the student will participate in a forum where the important concepts of Police Administration Chapter 10 & 11 and the “Implementing community policing: The administrative problem” article are identified, defined, discussed and correlated.

Objective C:

In a group project setting, the student will participate in a forum where the important concepts of Police Administration Chapter 13 and the “Community policing and the police officer” article are identified, defined, discussed and correlated.

 

Test #1

 

Goal 5:

The student will understand the concept of administrative support by investigating organizational planning.

 

Reading Assignments

            Text:

Police Administration Chapters 4, 7, and 9

 

            Articles:

            “Strategic planning for community policing” (including Sections 1-8)

            “Information systems and the development of policing”

            “Police accountability and community policing”

 

Objective A:

In a group project setting, the student will participate in a forum where the important concepts of Police Administration Chapter 9 and the “Strategic planning for community policing” article are identified, defined, discussed and correlated.

Objective B:

In a group project setting, the student will participate in a forum where the important concepts of Police Administration Chapter 4 and the “Information systems and the development of policing” article are identified, defined, discussed and correlated.

 

Objective C:

In a group project setting, the student will participate in a forum where the important concepts of Police Administration Chapter 7 and the “Police accountability and community policing” article are identified, defined, discussed and correlated.

 

Goal 6:

The student will understand the concept of management by investigating organizational goals and objectives.

 

Reading Assignments

            Text:

Police Administration Chapters 8 and 16

 

            Articles:

            “The police organization in transition”

            “Recruitment and selection for community policing”

 

Objective A:

In a group project setting, the student will participate in a forum where the important concepts of Police Administration Chapter 8 and “The police organization in transition” article are identified, defined, discussed and correlated.

Objective B:

In a group project setting, the student will participate in a forum where the important concepts of Police Administration Chapter 16 and the “Recruitment and selection for community policing” article are identified, defined, discussed and correlated.

 

Goal 7:

The student will understand the concept of line operations by investigating methods and tactics.

 

Reading Assignments

            Text:

Police Administration Chapters 15

 

            Articles:

            “Police crackdowns”

            “Catching career criminals”

            “KC Gun Experiment”

            “Manual of crime analysis map production”

 

Objective A:

In a group project setting, the student will participate in a forum where the important concepts of Police Administration Chapter 15 and the “Police crackdowns” article are identified, defined, discussed and correlated.

Objective B:

In a group project setting, the student will participate in a forum where the important concepts of Police Administration Chapter 15 and the “Catching career criminals” article are identified, defined, discussed and correlated.

Objective C:

In a group project setting, the student will participate in a forum where the important concepts of Police Administration Chapter 15 and “KC Gun Experiment” article are identified, defined, discussed and correlated.

Objective D:

In a group project setting, the student will participate in a forum where the important concepts of Police Administration Chapter 15 and the “Manual of crime analysis map production” article are identified, defined, discussed and correlated.

 

Goal 8:

The student will understand the importance of evaluation to police administration.

 

Reading Assignments

            Text:

Police Administration Chapters 14

 

            Articles:

            “Guidelines to implement and evaluate crime analysis and mapping in law enforcement”

 

Objective A:

In a group project setting, the student will participate in a forum where the important concepts of Police Administration Chapter 14 and the “Guidelines to implement and evaluate crime analysis and mapping in law enforcement” article are identified, defined, discussed and correlated.

 

Cumulative Final

 

 

 

 

University Studies Program

Oral Communication Flag

Sociology 491

Community Policing and Administration

 

This course includes requirements and learning activities that promote students’ abilities to…

 

1.          Earn significant course credit through extemporaneous oral presentations.

 

About 60% of the course credit comes from oral presentations.  Students are divided into teams (labeled with Police Department names – e.g., NYPD, Chicago PD and LAPD).  Only one team presents each class period.  Class presentations rotate in a sequential pattern from class-to-class.  Each team is comprised of five positions; one supervision position, three presenting positions, and one technical position.  Presenters are required to address predetermined important concepts, and to answer questions from their own team and from the class about their presentations.  The students are graded on their presentation and students in the audience are graded on the quality of question they ask.

 

2.         Understand the features and types of speaking in their discipline. 

 

The type of speaking addressed in this class is the professional presentation; whether the audience is a community group, news media or a panel of peer professionals.  The subject of the presentation integrates contemporary police management principles with community policing principles.  This meets requirements of MN POST, as expressed in the PPOE objectives, which require practice in constituency contact with community policing. Professional presentations are described, demonstrated, and practiced for and by the student throughout the course.  

 

3.          Adapt their speaking to field specific audiences.

 

The purpose of this course is to prepare the prospective peace office to learn the principles of effective management systems and community policing by developing professional quality presentations and presenting them to mock audiences.  The student audience normally replicates the dimensions of both a citizen group and a professional peer group, depending on the nature of the question from the audience.

 

 

4.         Receive appropriate feedback from teachers and peers, including suggestions for improvement.

 

Feedback and suggestions for improvement are immediate from peers.  Instructor feedback and suggestions for improvement are provided privately on Blackboard.

 

5.          Make use of technologies used for research and speaking in the fields.

 

The student is required to research presentations and submit them to Blackboard in MSWord format.  Overhead supplements or PowerPoint technologies are developed from the Word documents.  Additional points can be earned for interactive projects with the audience, use of videos, use of other media to make the presentation meaningful.

 

6.         Learn the conventions of evidence, format, usage and documentation in their fields.

 

Students develop evidence around pre-identified important concepts.  Guidance is given for presentation format design and presentations follow format.  The documentation developed by the groups and shared with the class is designed after materials used in the field.