Keynote and Break-out Session Descriptions

Session I: Keynote: Evidenced-Based Practices in Professional Learning Communities

Description: In this keynote presentation Dr. Beddow-Schubert and Dr. Robert "Jay" Palmer will address the fundamental principles underpinning professional learning communities and the evidence-based practices that guide them.

Keynote Speakers: Dr. Julie Beddow-Schubert has over 20 years of experience in EC12 education. She has served as a classroom teacher at the elementary and secondary level, technology integration specialist, prep-time provider, Title I teacher, principal, district technology director and district curriculum director. Most recently, Julie joined the College of Education at Winona State University as faculty. She has extensive training and experience in curriculum design, staff development, professional learning community development and cognitive coaching.

Dr. Robert “Jay” Palmer is Associate Professor in the Department of Social Work at Winona State University. He is a Licensed Independent Social Worker in the State of Minnesota. Dr. social work experience includes working with persons experiencing HIV/AIDS, homelessness, gang involved Latino youth, and persons with severe and persistent mental illness. His primary research interests involve andragogical strategies that support professional learning communities.

Technology: Flipping the Classroom

Description: Participants will learn what it means to flip the classroom and specific strategies to create materials to do so.

Facilitator: Chad Kjorlien is the Faculty Development Coordinator within the Teaching, Learning, and Technology Services unit at Winona State University. In this position, Chad facilitates the creation of programming and resources designed to help faculty adopt meaningful instructional technologies into their curriculum. Chad received his Ed.D. in Administration of Higher Education from the University of Louisville in 2001 with a focus on human resource issues related to faculty recruitment, policy, and programming for professional development efforts designed to promote the use of instructional technologies. Previous to his work at WSU, Chad spent nine years at Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota as Director of the Office of Instructional Technology and Director of the Center for Excellence in Learning and Teaching.

STEM: Technologies Showcase

Description: We will explore newer technologies and their uses to teach STEM subjects. We will explore personal drones, GoPro Cameras, GPS units, Bug vacs, and other technologies to get students outside

Facilitators: Dr. Jim Reineke is the chair of educational studies at Winona State University. He teaches courses in educational foundations and educational technology. His scholarly interests include the history of education reform, market-driven reforms in education, and the implementation of technology in classroom instruction.

Norb Thomes is a member of Teaching, Learning, and Technology at Winona State University. Norb’s duties include training and assisting in the integration of tablet technology into the curriculum and faculty support of the learning management system. In past careers, Norb has taught graphic design and web design at a community college, worked in web design and graphic design for a software company, and programmed computers for a mainframe manufacturer. He holds a B.S. in Computer Science, M.Ed. in Educational Leadership, and Ph.D. in Education.

Social Justice: Examining Diversity in Schools: Promoting Dignity and Excellence

Description:The faces of American students are changing; gone are classrooms where most students have similar needs and experiences. Participants in this session will examine high leverage teaching practices that help educators connect with students, maintain dignity in classroom management, and develop assignments and authentic assessment that promote effective individualized instruction.

A case study highlighting a school that reinvented itself to meet the needs of a changing student population will provide a fresh lens through which participants will analyze their own methods for connecting with immigrant students and families and marginalized parents. Information will be presented from educator and parent perspectives.

Facilitators: Dr. Amy Hornby Uribe is an Assistant Professor of Spanish at Winona State University and chair of the Teacher Education Assembly on campus. Amy has taught middle and high school Spanish in Wisconsin and Texas and is also certified in ESL. Amy earned her BS in Education from UW-La Crosse and her PhD in Foreign Language Education from the University of Texas at Austin. Before coming to Winona in 2012, Amy was a Clinical Assistant Professor with the UTeach Liberal Arts program in Austin, TX. In addition to her work at the university and secondary levels, she has also worked with pre-service elementary teachers, elementary language materials development and has taught elementary Spanish as a volunteer at her children’s school. She is excited to increase her involvement in K-12 education in Winona and the Upper Midwest.

Oscar Uribe is the principal at Cotter Schools in Winona. He has been in education for 10 years both as a Spanish teacher and as an administrator. As a teacher he developed a Spanish for Native Speakers program designed to teach academic Spanish to native and heritage speakers. Before becoming the principal at Cotter he was an Assistant Principal at Lanier High School in Austin, TX, a school comprised mainly of immigrant students. Oscar’s unique experience as an immigrant, English Language Learner and bicultural person has helped him connect with students that are facing the same challenges that he has had to overcome in his own education. In his current role he is working hard to form a more integrated student body in an internationally diverse school. Oscar has a teaching certificate from Texas State University where he also completed a Master’s in School Administration with an emphasis in school improvement.

Professional Learning Communities in Practice: Problem-solving in Professional Learning

Description: Now that you have a basic understanding of Professional Learning Communities (PLC), it is time to reflect on what is working and not working. We will seek to enhance capacities and address challenges that manifest in your professional work together. Participates will take away practical strategies for negotiating a complex web of interactions that make up dynamics of a PLC.

Facilitator: Dr. Julie Beddow-Schubert has over 20 years of experience in EC12 education. She has served as a classroom teacher at the elementary and secondary level, technology integration specialist, prep-time provider, Title I teacher, principal, district technology director and district curriculum director. Most recently, Julie joined the College of Education at Winona State University as faculty. She has extensive training and experience in curriculum design, staff development, professional learning community development and cognitive coaching.

Dr. Robert “Jay” Palmer is Associate Professor in the Department of Social Work at Winona State University. He is a Licensed Independent Social Worker in the State of Minnesota. Dr. social work experience includes working with persons experiencing HIV/AIDS, homelessness, gang involved Latino youth, and persons with severe and persistent mental illness. His primary research interests involve andragogical strategies that support professional learning communities.

Session II: Keynote: Developmental Achievement vs. Standardized Growth: The Common Core and The Not So Common Student

Description: This presentation is based on the success of two diverse and highly impacted classrooms. Standards as well as common curricula, pedagogy and assessments greatly challenge our ability to effectively address the needs of individual students. Why? There really is no common child, and none can be standardized. A truly effective learning environment is a place where no student feels disadvantaged by his or her unique background, but instead is empowered by it.

Keynote Speaker: Dr. Robert Howman is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Education Leadership at Winona State University. A graduate of the College of William and Mary, Dr. Howman has several years of experience as a teacher, principal, guidance specialist, and director of student services. Much of his work has been in highly diverse communities serving at-risk youth, including students with disabilities, English language learners, gang/adjudicated youth, immigrant and refugee families, economically disadvantaged children and those who are homeless.

Technology: iPads in the Classroom

Description: Participants will be introduced to a collection of iPads apps that have classroom uses.

Facilitators: Dr. Jim Reineke is the chair of educational studies at Winona State University. He teaches courses in educational foundations and educational technology. His scholarly interests include the history of education reform, market-driven reforms in education, and the implementation of technology in classroom instruction.

Norb Thomes is a member of Teaching, Learning, and Technology at Winona State University. Norb’s duties include training and assisting in the integration of tablet technology into the curriculum and faculty support of the learning management system. In past careers, Norb has taught graphic design and web design at a community college, worked in web design and graphic design for a software company, and programmed computers for a mainframe manufacturer. He holds a B.S. in Computer Science, M.Ed. in Educational Leadership, and Ph.D. in Education.

STEM: Myth Busting

Description: The impacts of STEM curriculum and teaching go far beyond the surface-level expectations of mainstream understanding of STEM education. In this interactive series of activities, the presenters aim to bust common myths, or ways of thinking about, STEM education:

Myth #1: STEM is science.
Busted: STEM is a way of exploring and organizing the world.

Myth #2: Only engineers use the Engineering design process.
Busted: We all use the process, in conjunction with other resources, for problem-solving

Myth #3: The answer is the end.
Busted: You don’t need the answers to teach STEM; Answers are often the beginning of the new inquiry.

Myth #4: You have to be a STEM school to practice STEM education.
Busted: With limited resources and an inquiry mindset, anyone can teach and learn STEM

Facilitators: Joel Traver, Ed.S., is currently the Program Coordinator for the Winona State University’s College of Education. Mr. Traver has taught at the middle school, high school, and higher education levels over the course of 7 years--most recently coordinating several programs and special projects at Winona State University. His research interests include new teacher induction, professional development schools, adult learning, and project-based learning.

Timothy Indahl, MA, ABD, is an Assistant Professor in the Rochester Education Department at Winona State University.Tim has taught at the elementary, middle school, high school, and college levels over the course of 10 years. He currently teaches undergraduate teacher education students in a variety of methods courses, primarily in the STEM disciplines. He is completing his finishing his doctorate in Educational Psychology from the University of Utah, and his research interests include math learning, science learning, and how different memory processes impact learning.

Eric Paulsen is a Fourth Grade STEM Teacher at Jefferson Elementary STEM School in Winona, MN. Mr. Paulsen has taught STEM subjects and STEM integration techniques at middle school, high school and presently in 4th grade at Jefferson. He is a lead curriculum designer and coordinator for elementary level STEM. His interests include research and delivery of LEGO Education, Engineering is Elementary, FOSS and CASE curricula.

Child Advocacy: Promoting Social/Emotional Well-Being for Children in Partnership with Child Services

Description: Abused or neglected children are more likely to perform poorly in school, get involved in criminal activities and later maltreat their own children. Experiencing a chronic stressful condition such as child maltreatment creates toxic stress, which disrupts developing brain architecture. Workshop participants will learn about the impact of trauma on brain development, examine neglect, physical and sexual abuse and mental injury as child trauma and receive a public child welfare system overview. In addition, Minnesota's Differential Response child welfare system, which includes Family Assessment and Family Investigative Responses will be covered. Participants will also learn about child maltreatment reporting laws and examine screening guidelines to assist in reporting suspected child maltreatment. Protective factors will be shared with participants along with ways child welfare agencies can work with school-based personnel to utilize engagement strategies to achieve child safety, family stability, and advocate for children and families to reach positive outcomes.

Facilitator: Carole Wilcox, MSW/LISW, (BS – Sociology, UWRF; MSW, University of Minnesota) manages the Child Safety and Prevention unit within the Child Safety and Permanency Division of the Minnesota’s Department of Human Services and serves as Community Faculty for graduate students at the University of Minnesota School of Social Work. Carole has expertise in strength-based family centered child welfare reforms, direct practice, child welfare supervision and knowledge of utilizing child welfare systemic improvements to address disparate outcomes for children of color and American Indian children. She focuses on programs and initiatives that highlight child abuse prevention efforts, protective factors and resiliency, and the impact of trauma on early brain development. Carole has in-depth knowledge regarding Minnesota’s Child Protection Response Continuum in addressing child safety concerns. She has worked closely with Minnesota county and tribal social service agencies to develop a child protection system that responds differentially to reports of abuse and neglect and to develop early intervention programs for Minnesota’s most at-risk children. Carole manages initiatives that utilize a strength based family-centered framework. Her leadership has assisted Minnesota in prioritizing reduction of racial/ethnic disparities within the public child welfare system through data analysis, shared leadership with parent and community leaders, and systemic partnerships and strategies.

The Common Core and the Uncommon Student: Core Standards and the Uncommon Student Applied

Description: This session will be a problem-solving discussion based on issues presented during the keynote presentation. Attendees will have the opportunity to consider how to apply this information to their own schools.

Facilitator: Dr. Robert Howman is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Education Leadership at Winona State University. A graduate of the College of William and Mary, Dr. Howman has several years of experience as a teacher, principal, guidance specialist, and director of student services. Much of his work has been in highly diverse communities serving at-risk youth, including students with disabilities, English language learners, gang/adjudicated youth, immigrant and refugee families, economically disadvantaged children and those who are homeless.
Contact Us

Outreach & Continuing Education
Somsen Hall 106
continuingeducation@winona.edu
507.457.5080

College of Education
Glidemeister 103
507.457.2876