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Acknowledgments

Introduction

Featured Trees

Tree Location

Additional Feature Photos

Dawn Redwood

Kentucky Coffeetree

Ornamental Pear

Blue Beech

Northern Catalpa

Ginkgo

American Yellowwood

River Birch

Red Pine

Magnolia

Japanese Tree Lilac

Quaking Aspen

Tulip Tree

Eastern Redbud

Eastern White Pine

Amur Maackia

Autumn Purple Ash

Crabapple 'Donald Wyman'

Princess Kay Canadian Plum

Ruby Red Horsechestnut

Black Locust ‘Purple Robe’

Northern Pin Oak

Freeman Maple

Black Alder

Littleleaf Linden

Balsam Fir

Norway Spruce 'Acrocona'

Trees Company

Glossary

References

<% Function GetHeadline() GetHeadline="Dawn Redwood" End Function %> > Trees of Winona State University > Dawn Redwood

1.  Dawn Redwood

 (Metasequoia glyptostroboides)

One spring several years ago, a WSU student worker who assisted the grounds crew suggested planting a tree for a class project.  After discussing the various options, the Dawn Redwood (Metasequoia glyptostroboides) was selected. Early on a Saturday morning representatives from the student's class helped plant the Dawn Redwood; the tree with a fascinating history. 

This particular species was previously known through fossil records, which date back 30-50 million years.  Considered to be a relative of the Sequoia, the Dawn Redwood is a deciduous conifer. 

Most conifer trees are commonly thought of as evergreens.  However, the Dawn Redwood exhibits deciduous tree behavior because its needle-like leaves turn color in autumn and are dropped. 

As recently as the mid-1940s, this tree was thought to be extinct until living Dawn Redwood trees were found in the province of Hupeh, China.  In 1944, the Dawn Redwood was re-introduced to the U.S. by the Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University.

The Dawn Redwood is a rapid growing tree and can grow to be 60 feet tall.  Its leaves are needle-like, opposite, and arranged in flat sprays.  They are 1/2  to 1 1/2 inches long, soft and light green turning a bronzy brown in the fall.  The tree features fissured and shredded bark.

WSU's sole Dawn Redwood can be found just west of the main (north) entrance to Memorial Hall.

 

(see #52 on the  maps)

 

 Dawn Redwood

Last Modified: Thursday, May 08, 2008 13:59 by Rhone Richard

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