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Acknowledgments

Introduction

Featured Trees

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Additional Feature Photos

Dawn Redwood

Kentucky Coffeetree

Ornamental Pear

Blue Beech

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Ginkgo

American Yellowwood

River Birch

Red Pine

Magnolia

Japanese Tree Lilac

Quaking Aspen

Tulip Tree

Eastern Redbud

Eastern White Pine

Amur Maackia

Autumn Purple Ash

Crabapple 'Donald Wyman'

Princess Kay Canadian Plum

Ruby Red Horsechestnut

Black Locust ‘Purple Robe’

Northern Pin Oak

Freeman Maple

Black Alder

Littleleaf Linden

Balsam Fir

Norway Spruce 'Acrocona'

Trees Company

Glossary

References

<% Function GetHeadline() GetHeadline="Autumn Purple Ash " End Function %> > Trees of Winona State University > Autumn Purple Ash

17.  Autumn Purple Ash

 (Fraxinus americana ‘Purple Ash’)

One of Minnesota's most popular native trees is the White Ash (Fraxinus americana).  The particular cultivar of the White Ash family, "Autumn Purple," noted for its excellent purple fall color, is well-represented on the Winona State University campus. 

Autumn Purple Ash trees adapt to most pH levels and are quite salt tolerant.  This is an important consideration for any boulevard tree due to the large amounts of salt used during ice and snow removal on Minnesota streets during winter months.

The Autumn Purple Ash has an upright oval form with compound leaves that are deep green on top, but with a pale underside which may suggest its common name, White Ash.  These trees can grow to be 70 to 80 feet tall but along city streets mature trees generally reach 50 to 60 feet in height.

The White Ash and its many cultivars are among the most valuable native trees.  The wood is hard, tough and elastic, with a straight, narrow grain.  The wood from Ash trees is used for furniture, millwork, railroad ties, and athletic equipment such as tennis racket handles and hockey sticks.

Intriguingly, in early American history the Ash tree was regarded as having special powers to ward off sickness and evil spirits.  Legend stated that no snake would cross a barrier of Ash leaves.

Many Autumn Purple Ash trees can be found at Winona State University; along Main Street, west of Memorial Hall, near the northwest corner of Pasteur Hall, and the south end of Johnson Street near the railroad tracks.  Perhaps the most impressive Autumn Purple Ash trees at Winona State are located along the south boulevard of the Morey-Shepard residence hall buildings.

(see #4B on the maps)

Autumn Purple Ash

Last Modified: Thursday, May 08, 2008 13:59 by

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