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Introduction

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Dawn Redwood

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Princess Kay Canadian Plum

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References

<% Function GetHeadline() GetHeadline="Princess Kay Canadian Plum" End Function %> > Trees of Winona State University > Princess Kay Canadian Plum

19.  Princess Kay Canadian Plum

 (Prunus nigra 'Princess Kay')

The Princess Kay Canadian Plum (Prunus nigra 'Princess Kay') is an ornamental Plum tree which was discovered in the wild in Itasca County, near Grand Rapids, Minnesota, near the headwaters of the Mississippi River by Catherine (Kay) and Robert Nyland.

The Prunus nigra and Prunus americana varieties of Plum trees have overlapping characteristics and often cross pollinate.  The Princess Kay Plum rarely produces fruit and the double flowers last several days longer than the other Plum species. 

Since the branches in spring are laden with double white flowers, many view the appearance as though the tree is covered in popcorn.  Sometimes called the Popcorn Tree, the Princess Kay Canadian Plum's fragrant, white flowers emerge before the foliage.

The blooms of the Princess Kay Canadian Plum tree often remind viewers of another popular flowering prunus species: the spectacular flowering cherry species found in Washington, D.C. and celebrated each spring during Cherry Blossom Time.

This small, ornamental flowering tree normally reaches a height of 15 to 20 feet.  The trunk and branches are dark brown and have large white lenticels that add much winter interest. The leaves turn reddish-purple in the fall.

Winona State has two young Princess Kay Plums located just below the windows on the south side of Baldwin Lounge of Kryzsko Commons Student Union.  The location is perfect for students studying for final exams in late April and early May, just as the Princess Kay Plum trees are blooming.

(see #63 on the maps)

Princess Kay Canadian Plum

Last Modified: Thursday, May 08, 2008 13:59 by

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