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Acknowledgments

Introduction

Featured Trees

Tree Location

Additional Feature Photos

Dawn Redwood

Kentucky Coffeetree

Ornamental Pear

Blue Beech

Northern Catalpa

Ginkgo

American Yellowwood

River Birch

Red Pine

Magnolia

Japanese Tree Lilac

Quaking Aspen

Tulip Tree

Eastern Redbud

Eastern White Pine

Amur Maackia

Autumn Purple Ash

Crabapple 'Donald Wyman'

Princess Kay Canadian Plum

Ruby Red Horsechestnut

Black Locust ‘Purple Robe’

Northern Pin Oak

Freeman Maple

Black Alder

Littleleaf Linden

Balsam Fir

Norway Spruce 'Acrocona'

Trees Company

Glossary

References

<% Function GetHeadline() GetHeadline="Balsam Fir " End Function %> > Trees of Winona State University > Balsam Fir

26. Balsam Fir

 (Abies balsamea)

The Balsam Fir (Abies balsamea) is a very hearty evergreen found throughout the lakes region of the upper Midwest, and Winona State has proudly placed several of these trees on campus.

The Balsam Fir is extremely fragrant and has an attractive, symmetrically pyramidal growth pattern.  Both of these characteristics make it a popular choice for Christmas trees.

Balsam Fir can be identified by their flat, dark-green needles, which have white, silvery bands of stomata on the underside.  The branchlets of the soft Balsam Fir needles are springy and in days gone by were used in mattresses and pillows for lumbermen and campers in the northern woods providing comfortable and aromatic rest.

The fruit of the Balsam Fir is a dark violet cone when young and grows to a 2 to 4 inch long gray-brown cone when mature.

The bark of all but the very oldest Balsam Fir trees has blisters containing aromatic resin.  Interestingly, this resin is so pure and transparent, it can be used for cementing microscope lenses and mounting microscopic specimens in laboratory experiments.  Unfortunately, the resin is highly flammable and in a forest fire can quickly lead to the demise of the tree.

The Balsam Fir prefers moist locations and rarely grows to be taller than 75 feet.

A group of Balsam Fir can be found on the east side of Winona State University's Performing Arts Center.

(see #78 on the maps)

Last Modified: Thursday, May 08, 2008 13:59 by

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