Dr. Jessica Siebenbruner

Professor

Education

• PhD Child Psychology and Applied Developmental Psychology Certificate University of Minnesota, 2005
• MA Child Psychology University of Minnesota, 2003
• BA Psychology and Child Psychology Minor University of Minnesota, 1999

Dr. Siebenbruner’s interests include adolescent development, adolescent risk behavior (e.g., alcohol/drug use, sexual behavior), young adult development and romantic relationships.

She teaches the following courses:

• PSY 210 Introduction to Psychological Science
• PSY 250 Developmental Psychology
• PSY 275 Psychology Gender
• PSY 310 Child Development
• PSY 311 Careers in Psychology
• PSY 315 Adolescent Development
• PSY 423 Psychopathology of Childhood

 

Supervised Student Research

Students are welcome to inquire about possible research opportunities available with Dr. Siebenbruner throughout the year. They are also welcome to present their own research ideas for consideration for independent research projects.

Selected Publications

Siebenbruner, J., Zimmer-Gembeck, M. J., & Egeland, B. (2007). Sexual partners and contraceptive use: A 16-year prospective study predicting abstinence and risk behavior. Journal of Research on Adolescence, 17(1), 179-206.

Siebenbruner, J., Englund, M., Egeland, B., & Hudson, K. (2006). Developmental antecedents of late adolescence substance use patterns. Development and Psychopathology, 18, 551-571.

Siebenbruner, J., & Shaffer, A. (2005, April). Sexual activity during adolescence and young adult outcomes. Poster presented at the Society for Research in Child Development Biennial Meeting, Atlanta, GA.

Siebenbruner, J., & Englund, M. (2005, April). Adolescent substance use and young adult adaptation. Poster presented at the Society for Research in Child Development Biennial Meeting, Atlanta, GA.

Zimmer-Gembeck, M. J., Siebenbruner, J., & Collins, W. A. (2004). A prospective study of intraindividual and peer influences on adolescents’ heterosexual romantic and sexual behavior. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 33(4), 381-394